The Nolan 100

The Nolan 100 is a birthday tribute to Sidney Nolan from 100 individuals worldwide. We invited people who knew Sidney, worked with him, or have been influenced by his work or his legacy to choose a ‘favourite’ Nolan work and tell us why.  We will share these choices throughout the year - to see each addition to the gallery, follow sidneynolantrust on Instagram - #Nolan100.  

78. Artist drawing nude - Victoria Lynn

78. Artist drawing nude - Victoria Lynn

“I have chosen a work that I own through inheritance from my late father Elwyn (Jack) Lynn who wrote two books and several articles on Sid. Jack and Sid were great friends, despite living very far apart: Jack in Sydney, Australia, and Sid in London and Wales. This image, which we have given the title 'Artist Drawing Nude', is related to the Eliza Fraser series. Mrs Fraser and her husband Captain Fraser were marooned on Fraser Island Queensland in 1947. He died, and she was captured by the local Indigenous Badjala people, eventually freed by an escaped convict, John Graham. He has often been depicted in striped clothing in Nolan's pictures, and Mrs Fraser has been depicted nude. Sid created this drawing in my father's home in 1984. It brings back wonderful memories of the lasting friendship between Sidney Nolan and Elwyn Lynn.” Victoria Lynn, Director of TarraWarra Museum of Art, Australia. http://www.twma.com.au/ Sidney Nolan, Artist Drawing Nude, 1984, © Sidney Nolan Trust

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77. Rosa Mutabilis - Catherine Hunter

77. Rosa Mutabilis - Catherine Hunter

“I met Sidney Nolan in the last year of his life. His place was certain in the story of Australian art - the myth-making, the great subjects. The steel-headed Kellys, which shielded the inner life and relationships, were among the most enduring images in Australian art. And Sidney Nolan, with Mary close by this side during an Easter egg hunt with their family, was engaging, personable but not prepared to give much away about his painting. He wanted us to discover it on our own terms. And I had the chance to rediscover Nolan much later with the Art Gallery of New South Wales’s retrospective in 2007 which I followed closely for a documentary called ‘Mask and Memory’. I remember most of those paintings and even where they hung in the space but so many of my #Nolan100 favourites have been chosen by others. However, with Nolan, the output was immense so you are spoilt for choice. His painting Rosa Mutabilis has always resonated with me. It speaks of those life-changing years at Heide where Nolan’s painting was inseparable from his time with Sunday and John Reed. Sunday’s love of roses and her love of Nolan were encapsulated in this painting. To this day, it moves me to the core because of the heartbreak that followed for all those involved in the oft-told story of the Heide years. As with so much of Nolan’s work the apparent simplicity belies the domestic drama that lay behind it. I gave a print to my mother and it was cherished by her. That print now hangs in my office - a constant reminder of how lucky I have been to have met artists in the course of my work." Catherine Hunter, Australian filmmaker, journalist, television producer and director. https://www.artbrief.com.au/ . Current film projects include impressionist John Peter Russell, sculptor Bronwyn Oliver and an update on her film about architect Glenn Murcutt. Her 2007 film ‘Mask and Memory: Sidney Nolan’ is available from the Sidney Nolan Trust gallery.

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76. Abraham and Isaac - Sarah Bardwell

76. Abraham and Isaac - Sarah Bardwell

“About a year ago I was at a concert in Britten’s library at the Red House in Aldeburgh, his home with his partner Peter Pears during the middle of the 20th century. The concert programme included Canticle II which Britten wrote in 1952. It was not a piece that I knew but hearing it for the first time in Britten and Pears’ own library, sung by two young, passionate singers, accompanied on Britten’s Steinway piano was one of those musical moments that will stay with me forever. At the opening of the canticle Britten uses the two voices, singing in rhythmic unison, to create the voice of God talking to Abraham. It is a breath-taking effect and the impact is spine chilling not least as God is asking Abraham to sacrifice his own son. I was so taken with the piece that I wanted to find out more and was delighted to discover that Britten owned the work Nolan had painted after Canticle II. The painting, currently in store in the Britten-Pears Foundation archive based at the Red House, has vivid colours that are as memorable as the music. The picture, with Uluru as a backdrop, depicts a naked, bearded Abraham seated beside his son Isaac. Alongside them is a goat or small four legged animal. Given the glorious colours it is perhaps the moment that God has declared that the sacrifice does not need to go ahead and Abraham appears to have noticed the animal that will be the substitute sacrifice. In the canticle Britten marks this same moment by repeating the technique he used at the beginning for the voice of God, two voices in unison. When this musical theme reappears it becomes less chilling and more spine tingling. These two works of art enhance and complement each other perfectly. To me, they have now become inextricably linked. I cannot see the painting without humming the tune nor hear the tune without imagining the painting.” Sarah Bardwell is the General Director of the Britten-Pears Foundation. https://brittenpears.org/ Sidney Nolan, Abraham and Isaac, 1967, mixed media, 50.2 x 74.3cm, gift from the artist to Benjamin Britten and Peter Pears in 1968 ©Sidney Nolan Trust

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75. Landscape Carnarvon Range, Queensland - Catherine Noske

75. Landscape Carnarvon Range, Queensland - Catherine Noske

“In South of the West, Ross Gibson reminds the reader that culture and nature are concepts, categories we apply to spaces in order to narrativise them, seat them in relation to human experiences. Nolan as an artist was inordinately aware of the narratives at play in the ‘natural’ world – explorers, Ned Kelly, scenes of outback townships. But this painting trades less on the iconic. Humming with the heat that rises from the ranges with the gloss finish of Nolan’s signature Ripolin house paint, this is a scene that seems to demand we listen rather than speak. There is movement in this painting. The feathery detail in the waving grasses of the foreground is a light note, something delicate before the bold and almost abstract stacking of rocks, their startling colours, the dark realism of the mountains in the distance. The sky itself is not empty, but alive with the subtle shifting of cloud, drawing the gaze endlessly upwards. It pulls at me – this is why I chose this work. I find myself, in looking at it, following again and again the path that Nolan offers, from the foreground wandering out towards the mountains and then up, achingly up, into the light. It is not easy, this painting. Any impression of simplicity is deceptive. It reminds me of loving to the point of pain. It seems to hold desire, but simultaneously an awareness of the realities of such longings. That possession of such a place is not possible. That terra nullius is a myth. There is enough of the surreal here that the gesture of the painting is laid bare: this is not the place, this can never be the place, this can only ever reach for the experience of it, and offer it in silence to those who wish to listen.” Dr. Catherine Noske is a lecturer in Creative Writing and editor of Westerly Magazine at the University of Western Australia. Her research focuses on contemporary Australian writing of place, and has been awarded the A.D. Hope Prize from the Association for the Study of Australian Literature. She has twice been awarded the Elyne Mitchell Prize for Rural Women Writers, and her current manuscript, a novel, was shortlisted for the 2015 Dorothy Hewett Award. Her #Nolan100 choice is part of the University of Western Australia's 'My Collection' project. See also #Nolan100 – No.54, No.53, No.38, No.23. Sidney Nolan, Landscape Carnarvon Range, Queensland, 1948, Ripolin on board, 91 x 121 cm, The University of Western Australia Art Collection, Tom Collins Memorial Fund, 1953, © Sidney Nolan Trust

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74. Mrs Reardon at Glenrowan - Adrian Kelly

74. Mrs Reardon at Glenrowan - Adrian Kelly

“I like the contrast of the beautifully sublime landscapes and the harsher superimposed figures in Nolan’s Ned Kelly paintings and I love the tales they tell. When it came to Ned Kelly there was no need to let the truth get in the way of a good story; accounts of his actions were fantastic enough. In ‘Mrs Reardon at Glenrowan’ we see Margaret Reardon running from the burning Glenrowan Hotel, with her baby Bridget in her arms. The hotel was on fire because the police, believing the entire Kelly Gang to be inside, had set it on fire. They weren’t all inside the hotel, some had gone to get tools to derail the train coming from Bealla. The hotel was full of hostages and Dan Kelly was going to release them but the owner wouldn’t let him, she said “No, Ned wants to give a lecture first”. Dan did open the doors but there was a gunfight and some civilians were injured. The baby blanket was used as evidence at the Royal Commission and it had a burn hole where the bullet passed through. Neither Margaret nor her baby were injured but one of her other children, a son called Michael, was shot and injured. I showed a series of Nolan’s Ned Kelly prints in Donegal, in the Northwest of Ireland several years ago and was surprised when a friend of mine told me that she was related to the Reardons. It made me feel closer to the pictures. Sidney Nolan was a fantastic painter, and it’s often difficult to stop such gifted technique from getting in the way of a good painting. It didn’t bother Nolan much.” Adrian Kelly, Curator, Glebe House and Gallery, County Donegal, Ireland. http://glebegallery.ie/ Sidney Nolan, Mrs Reardon at Glenrowan, 1946, Ripolin on composition board, 90.8 x 121.5 cm, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Gift of Sunday Reed, 1977

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73. Ern Malley - Isabella Boorman

73. Ern Malley - Isabella Boorman

“I have to admit when I first turned up to The Rodd in 2017 I simply did not know what to expect. I had begun to plan our exhibition in St Davids, Wales, for Nolan’s centenary, with images from books of Ned Kelly and the Outback floating around my mind. Our exhibition is titled Sidney Nolan and Graham Sutherland: A Sense of Place, and I had prepared myself for an exhibition of landscape painting. What I encountered completely caught me off guard. In I walked and there staring at me was this huge head, its bright blues and yellows bouncing off the surface. This painting is believed to have been created in 1973 as part of an Ern Malley series, the fictitious poet whose creators set out to undermine the modernism of the Angry Penguins. Nolan boldly stated in 1975 that: “I think that without Ern Malley there wouldn’t have been any Ned Kelly. It made me take the risk of putting against the Australian bush an utterly strange object”. This work is highly significant to me, as it will be exhibited for the very first time (outside The Rodd) in September 2017 at Oriel y Parc. Both Nolan and Sutherland were directly responding to their sense of environment in distinct and inventive ways. Visiting The Rodd gave me the rare experience of seeing where the artist worked, his materials, his surroundings, his home, and how this all infiltrated his art in such an original way. Nolan’s time spent at The Rodd was an intense period of creativity, surrounded by the natural landscape, and what emerged were further intriguing series of heads. The spectacles suggest this is in fact a self-portrait. As ever I was in the midst of worrying about and planning the exhibition when all of a sudden I turned around in the store and saw his tongue mischievously sticking out at me, in typical Nolan fashion. All I could really do was laugh! Having the opportunity to visit Sidney Nolan’s studio, to see his artworks in situ and the place he chose to live late in life, is an experience I will forever treasure.” Isabella Boorman, Exhibitions Curator at Amgueddfa Cymru – National Museum Wales, and Curator of “Sidney Nolan and Graham Sutherland: A Sense of Place”, held at Oriel y Parc Gallery, St Davids, Pembrokeshire, SA62 6NW. Exhibition runs from 30 September 2017 to 28 January 2018, open daily: 10 am-4 pm. Sidney Nolan, Ern Malley (Self-Portrait), 1973, oil on board, 121.5 x 121.5 cm. Collection of the Sidney Nolan Trust; © Sidney Nolan Trust.

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72. Carcase in Swamp - Elpida Hadzi-Vasileva

72. Carcase in Swamp - Elpida Hadzi-Vasileva

"I was invited to do an artist in residency at Sidney Nolan Trust in September 2016. This was two weeks of living and working at The Rodd and an opportunity to learn more about how Sidney Nolan worked. While there I visited a local abattoir and collected alimentary tracts from various animals including cattle. I wanted to explore an idea of capturing detailed patterns while the skin is decomposing; capturing a moment of time. With the help of Michael Hancock we worked on exploring this idea and for the first time I made monoprints. The results were amazing and fast. At the same time I came across Carcase in Swamp, 1955. This is a painting that Nolan did as part of a commission to capture and record the catastrophe of the worst drought in Australia where, by August 1952, one and a quarter million cattle had rotted in Queensland and the Northern Territory. Nolan travelled to find thousands of carcasses strewn over vast areas, drying and decaying in the relentless heat. He did many drawings and took numerous photographs of the petrified and twisted remains of cattle. This painting (if seen upside down) also reminds me of a work I did called ‘Haruspex’, commissioned for the Pavilion for the Holy See for the Venice Biennale in 2015 - an installation created using pig’s caul fat, lamb intestines and cow’s omasum."

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71. Breaks like the Atlantic Ocean on my head - Michael Berkeley

71. Breaks like the Atlantic Ocean on my head - Michael Berkeley

"I really got to know Sid when he and Mary moved to the Rodd and put on music in their handsome oak-timbered barn. I would go over for tea or a drink and we would talk about music and, in particular, Benjamin Britten (my Godfather and a friend of Sid’s), Wagner and the visual stimulus Sid got from 'The Prince of the Pagodas' and 'The Ring'. What I particularly liked about Sid’s personality was the combination of raw earthiness and his profound feeling for the aesthetic. That is precisely what I see in so many of his canvases and drawings. My friendship with Nolan and love of his art made me keen to have some of his work so my heart leapt when I saw in a catalogue a crayon drawing which he had made in response to a Robert Lowell poem ‘Man and Wife’ and from which he quotes the last line, Breaks like the Atlantic Ocean on my head. Lowell was born in the same year as Sid, 1917, and they were good friends. It was not simply my knowing Sid that attracted me to the picture but rather the curious and indefinable interplay between the two figures. To me the red nature (colour and content) of the picture relates not only to the red earth of so much of Australia but also (obviously) to the opening lines of the poem: Tamed by Miltown, we lie on Mother’s bed; The rising sun in war paint dyes us red. On the reverse of the picture is a sketch by Nolan of Lowell. Psychological interplay between people and between poetry and the visual arts got me intrigued by that other great Australian artist, and brother-in-law to Nolan, Arthur Boyd. So when performing at the Sydney Festival I found in a gallery a picture by Boyd, 'Lovers and Lizard', from the 1993/4 series, 'The writer and his Muse', I could not resist buying it and hanging it below the Nolan. They make a powerful pair. But let me leave you contemplating the Nolan, and a clue to that interplay, by revealing a few more lines from the closing stanza: Now twelve years later, you turn your back. Sleepless, you hold your pillow to your hollows like a child, your old-fashioned tirade - loving, rapid, merciless - breaks like the Atlantic Ocean on my head. Michael Berkeley, Lord Berkeley of Knighton, CBE; composer, also presenter of BBC Radio 3’s Private Passions. http://www.michaelberkeley.co.uk/ Sidney Nolan, Breaks like the Atlantic Ocean on my head, c.1977, crayon on paper, private collection, © Sidney Nolan Trust.

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70. Bather in a Lily Pool - Amanda Fitzwilliams

70. Bather in a Lily Pool - Amanda Fitzwilliams

"When I came to work at the Sidney Nolan Trust seven years ago I was lucky enough to get to know Mary Nolan and have the chance to hear her stories of travelling with Sidney, of setting up the Trust at The Rodd, and in particular her fervent views on food and farming. After about a year at the Trust, I realised that the centenary of Sidney’s birth was on the horizon – a ‘now-or-never’ opportunity that we should investigate to see how it could help us promote his legacy and vision. Around that time, Kendrah Morgan and Lesley Harding, curators at Heide, came to stay and I had the chance to hear more stories, these coloured by romance, turbulence, generosity, bitterness and of course the creation of the Ned Kelly series of paintings. I asked Kendrah and Lesley about their favourite Nolan works – and the #Nolan100 project was born. The Sidney Nolan Trust is small in terms of human resources – just 2 permanent members of staff and a small clutch of freelancers, plus a dedicated board of Trustees – but we have Sidney’s truly extraordinary spirit that drives us on to try and finish what he started. Choosing a ‘favourite’ Nolan work is of course difficult – but as I have asked so many other people to take that challenge, I can’t flunk it myself! I have chosen ‘Bather in a Lily Pool’ – one of the works in our collection. I do love it – it has a pretty colour palette and prompts thoughts of Millais’ ‘Ophelia’ or Hockney’s ‘A Bigger Splash’. The title implies a leisurely moment, but the figure as Sidney painted it looks far from tranquil – he/she is definitely in trouble, flailing about in the water. Having worked with performing artists for much of my career, I love the physicality of the painting – surely if one had been able to watch Sidney making the work it would have seemed like a performance – his hand prints are planted at the top and he must have spun the board to get the drips and splashes of paint to run upwards – exhilarating!" Amanda Fitzwilliams is PR Manager at the Sidney Nolan Trust. Sidney Nolan, Bather in a Lily Pool, 1957, Ripolin and oil on board, 152.5 x 122 cm, Collection of the Sidney Nolan Trust, © Sidney Nolan Trust. See Kendrah Morgan's choice at No,3 and Lesley Harding's choice at No.39.

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69. Icebergs - Laurence Hall

69. Icebergs - Laurence Hall

"Still images, film and video recordings provide a glimpse into the past. Through digital video I have seen Sidney Nolan at the Rodd, masked up wielding spray cans and working the paint surface with his hands, demonstrating a use of techniques and tools beyond those of a more traditional painter. Clearly Nolan’s commercial and industrial background provided the foundations for a practice that took full advantage of technical innovations. My work with audio visual media enabled me to view a number of video files featuring Sidney Nolan. Seeing his method added a dimension to my appreciation of his landscape works. Nolan’s casual ease of technique, the incorporation of a wide range of paint innovations and his ready adoption of spray cans in the 1980s was revelatory. It was a genuine transformative process for my appreciation of his paintings. In some segments, Nolan had a spray can in each hand, targeting distinct areas of the canvas, overlapping the paint sprays where he intended and occasionally reaching into the painting with a hand or a brush to blend, mix or develop a feature. From a technical perspective, Nolan the Painter was very much a man of his time. As with his other works, Sidney Nolan's Antarctica paintings are a product of his willingness to engage with the latest developments of the paint industry. Nolan's expertise and resourcefulness resulted in the generation a unique style of landscape which captures an essence rather than aspires to direct likeness. As is so often the case when learning about Sidney Nolan’s life and practice, researching the Antarctica paintings yielded surprising results. I was astonished to learn of the volume of paintings the Antarctica trip engendered. Nolan travelled to Antarctica in the January of 1964. After 8 days spent on the ice and flying over the area by helicopter, he was in Australia by February. He travelled from Sydney to Adelaide for the Adelaide Arts Festival and was in London by April. April in London was Nolan’s first opportunity to use a new medium – an alkyd gel additive which promoted rapid paint drying. It seems likely this allowed him to work so quickly: By the September of 1964 Sidney Nolan had completed 60 Antarctica paintings, including Icebergs (McMurdo Sound Antarctica), 1964 and had painted over 50 of the Adelaide Ladies series as well. Icebergs (McMurdo Sound Antarctica), 1964 is possibly the most haunting of Sidney Nolan’s Antarctic paintings. It is a seascape punctuated with ice, a work that steps away from other landscape paintings and borders on dreamscape. The sky of Antarctic light manifests colour effects reflected and refracted by ice crystals and the optics of compressed and ancient ice flows. The berg in the foreground looks an unlikely object, yet it becomes something else when married to the green luminosity of its surroundings. The entire scene is lit by a sky without sun. Ice, air and water glow beneath a sky that is almost lour. With nothing to provide scale we see a seascape which may be on the verge of storm or may be a frozen moment of calm. Icebergs (McMurdo Sound Antarctica), 1964 embodies a tension that is visible in the dried paint surface. Some paint layers combine whilst others reject each other or form almost uneasy alliances. Antithetical paints are disciplined to mix, forming a texture which favours his goal for a view of ice in sunlight, frozen mountains on a turgid sea and all beneath a sky that stands on an ambiguous edge, paused in a moment of calm, a polar dawn, a dusk, or the eye of a storm. It is an essence of ice and sea in a place where weather is all of life and death and the elemental." Laurence Hall, Manager of Audio Visual Service, Art Gallery of New South Wales. https://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/ @ArtGAlleryofNSW Sidney Nolan, Icebergs McMurdo Sound, Antarctica), 1964, oil on board, 122 x 122 cm, © Sidney Nolan Trust. Private Collection / Photo courtesy of Agnew's, London and Bridgeman Images.

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68. Crucifixion - Rod Bugg

68. Crucifixion - Rod Bugg

“How difficult it is to select just a single work by Sidney Nolan from a body of work that is so extensive and wonderfully rich. My choice was triggered by a conversation with Lady Nolan when I was lead artist on the sculpture programme at The Rodd. She talked about her travels with Sidney and showed me her photographs of the Tuscan olive harvest from that time. She also spoke of Sidney’s earlier travels in the Mediterranean in both Italy and Greece and this fired my curiosity. When you look at the paintings that draw on those journeys you become aware that, even though he was not a religious man, Nolan must have been deeply struck by the spirituality that pervaded the countryside and the way of life of Southern Europe. I also became curious about a crucifix with all of its strange attachments that sits in one corner of his Rodd studio and wondered whether this was acquired during his Italian or Greek travels? I was interested to find more than five crucifixion paintings from the early fifties, all overlaid with the black linear tools of the crucifixion and the face of Christ. Could these paintings draw on just such primitive southern crucifixes? They certainly reveal his extraordinary intellectual and visual curiosity about religions and cultures. In the same way that the primitive crucifix is encrusted with symbols and messages, these works also include the instruments of the passion which feature so strongly in the Orthodox and Catholic churches, particularly in the South - the dice cast by the soldiers, the crowing cockerel, the hammer, the pliers, the lance and the sponge and so on. I eventually chose Crucifixion 1955, shown quite recently at The Rodd. Could it be that the painting overlays aspects of a Southern Mediterranean depiction of Christ and the crown of thorns with references to the Green Man of pre-Christian Northern Europe? Could the mask-like quality of the face of Christ be a reference to the mask of Ned Kelly set in the Italian/Greek landscape and mountains? Could it also be a deeply troubled portrait, and of whom? Maybe himself? Whilst being moved by the brutal image of the painting and the extraordinary quality of its execution there are also questions of what lies beneath the paint, what has been overpainted? What other painting hides below the surface of this particular crucifixion? This painting is as powerful, dark and beautiful as it is complex. It leaves me with so many questions, as well as the enduring force of its presence.” Rod Bugg is a practising artist and Emeritus Professor of the University of Arts, London. Until December 2006 he was Principal and CEO of Wimbledon School of Art, London. He is a current Trustee of the Sidney Nolan Trust. Sidney Nolan, Crucifixion, 1955, 92.5 x 122 cm, Ripolin and oil on hardboard, private collection, © Sidney Nolan Trust Crucifixion will be shown as part of ‘Sidney Nolan and Graham Sutherland: A Sense of Place’ at Oriel y Parc, St David’s, from 30th September 2017 to 28th January 2018.

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67. Untitled - Des Hughes

67. Untitled - Des Hughes

“This image is brutally honest both in its depiction of the harrowing subject matter and as a description of solid forms within a space. Like all these works in this series a portrait is suggested with economical restraint, a compromise between a wilful material and the demands of the painter, the canvas is never even touched but still allows direct link between hand and mark. The face shifts and contorts on the page, melting like wax. There is no doubt about the way a face has been modelled, but what is most surprising and sets this painting apart is the black grid sprayed on the right., which manages to cut in front, through and behind the figure. Despite its casual application, like graffiti or a crossing-out, sprayed in seconds, in a different universe to a painted line, it’s as heavy as a cast iron grate. The un-primed canvas lifts these two objects off the surface and into space. But somehow more convincing than the bust that seems to sit upon its plane, it is a net, a gate, a cage that you can reach out and touch.” Des Hughes is a sculptor living on the Welsh border, he has a solo exhibition at Martin Asbeak Gallery, Copenhagen in October and a monograph, ‘One Hand Washes the Other’ published by Black Dog in spring 2018. www.des-hughes.com Sidney Nolan, Untitled, 1987, 152 x 152.5 cm, spray paint on canvas, Collection of the Sidney Nolan Trust, © Sidney Nolan Trust

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66. Chinese Landscape - Celia Perceval

66. Chinese Landscape - Celia Perceval

“I like this painting as it is such a simple interpretation of the Karst mountain landscape in Southern China. I have travelled along the Li Jiang river and seen these beautiful mountains. I remember many occasions sitting, listening to Sid talking about his travel experiences and his thoughts on just about everything on earth! You could see how his work came from his ability to store a mine of information and visual memory from his travels. He used to say that a painting was 'spot on' when it worked instantly. Looking at this, a grand subject, executed so briefly with an immediacy so typical of Sid’s work, it is 'spot on'. Also, not accidentally, it seems to sympathise with Chinese ink paintings of similar subjects portraying a superb, peaceful landscape, with the same immediacy. Which, in my view, is the genius! Mum and Sid loved everything about China. They went there on several occasions. Wonderful experiences travelling on the Yangtze River by boat and around the Guilin area, surrounded by these amazing limestone mountains. It was one of their favourite places so this painting brings back nice memories for me.” Celia Perceval, artist; daughter of Mary Nolan (neé Boyd) and John Perceval. http://www.bridgetmcdonnellgallery.com.au/perceval-celia/ Chinese Landscape, 1982, spray paint on canvas, 183 x 160 cm, Collection of the Sidney Nolan Trust, © Sidney Nolan Trust

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65. Untitled (flower) - Roma Piotrowska

65. Untitled (flower) - Roma Piotrowska

“Sidney Nolan, arguably the most important Australian artist, is well recognised in his native land, but less known in Britain, where he lived for over 30 years. Much of the time in the UK was spent at his studio, The Rodd, situated on an English - Welsh border, only 55 miles from Ikon Gallery, where I am writing these words. Nolan painted a vast amount of paintings at The Rodd, including large scale, spray paintings, which were completely unknown in the UK until our exhibition at Ikon (10 June — 3 September 2017). It was extraordinary to find out that a whole series of previously not exhibited in Britain paintings were available on our doorstep. Ikon’s director Jonathan Watkins had no doubt we had to organise a show of these exceptional works. We have made a few trips to The Rodd to make a selection for the exhibition, and this is where I first saw my favourite Nolan’s flower painting. Unidentified, green plants seem to sway in the wind. Their large heads, painted on a brown background, dominate the composition. Spray technique adds a wonderful freshness to the work, evoking the notion of a slight vibration. The kind of air vibration one could see on a hot summer day. The painting was long listed for the Ikon exhibition, but a curatorial decision was made not to include it in the final selection in order to keep the thematic consistency of the show. For me this ‘rejected’ work will stay my favourite Nolan’s spray painting, as it conveys that carefree summer feeling. It is a perfect work to appreciate at the end of summer, as we approach the end of our Nolan show at Ikon.” Roma Piotrowska, Exhibitions Manager, Ikon Gallery, Birmingham. ‘Sidney Nolan’ continues at Ikon until Sunday 3rd September 2017. Sidney Nolan, Untitled, 1986, spray paint on canvas, 184 x 160 cm, Collection of the Sidney Nolan Trust, © Sidney Nolan Trust

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64. Stockman - Bridget McDonnell

64. Stockman - Bridget McDonnell

“This is a delightful small work on paper I sold in 1989. It depicts an Australian Stockman, during a drought. Sidney Nolan had been travelling around Australia with Cynthia and produced a series of ‘Outback’ paintings. Cynthia wrote a book also titled ‘Outback’ detailing these travels. The paintings were shown at David Jones Gallery in Sydney. There were 40 small works on paper, a bit like postcards, that were also shown, additional to the terrific large paintings of the main exhibition. This was one. Another I had was of a boat on the very blue water in Broome. They were terrific little paintings. All about the same size, 10 x 8 inches. Dry oil on paper. Whenever anyone would come in to my gallery and say they didn’t like Sidney Nolan’s paintings, I would show them this image in my catalogue and they would all say: ”Oh but I like that one!”.” Bridget McDonnell, Bridget McDonnell Gallery: Fine Australian Paintings, Drawings and Prints, Carlton, Victoria. www.bridgetmcdonnellgallery.com.au Sidney Nolan, Stockman, 1950, oil on paper, 25.1 x 20.3 cm, © Sidney Nolan Trust Exhibited in Drought Paintings by Sidney Nolan, David Jones Gallery, Sydney, 1953. There were 40 uncatalogued paintings added to this exhibition. Stockman was No.33.

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63. Myth Rider - Desmond Browne

63. Myth Rider - Desmond Browne

"The first moment I saw Myth Rider conjured to mind a photograph in Alan Moorehead’s account of Gallipoli published in 1956. It is of a Light Horseman galloping along the beach carrying a dispatch from Suvla to Anzac Cove. Horse and rider are framed by the wooden crosses of recent graves. My father, too, was a Light Horseman (though his two mounts were left at the Pyramids). So the sombre polyvinyl acetate tones of Myth Rider mean as much to me as they apparently did to Nolan. On the back of the painting done in New York at the start of 1959, he wrote: “Cynthia: NOT FOR SALE”. Nolan’s single day on the Peninsula in 1956 must have been in his mind, when he donated over 250 Gallipoli paintings to the War Memorial in Canberra in 1978, commenting that Gallipoli was “the nearest thing to a deeply felt common religious experience for Australians – even today”. Myth Rider is illustrated in the Thames and Hudson monograph of 1961, where Kenneth Clark commented on “the surprising disparity between conventional legend and Nolan’s imagination”. But Gavin Fry has pointed out how many of Nolan’s images are derived from photographs. Nolan, it seems, was not concerned with perpetuating a myth." Desmond Browne QC, former Chairman of the Bar of England and Wales – particularly interested in Nolan’s works on the Gallipoli theme. Sidney Nolan, Myth Rider, 1958, polyvinyl acetate on board, 122 x 152 cm, Private Collection, © Sidney Nolan Trust

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62. Head - Celia Johnson

62. Head - Celia Johnson

"I was preparing to write about a different painting; I’m drawn to Sidney Nolan’s beautifully strange and often disquieting landscapes, those that are informed by myth and painted from a distance with, as Kate McMillan discusses in her essay for Transferences, a colonial viewpoint. Or perhaps ‘Thames’ which feels very different, a more romantic exploration of the experience and observation of place that is no less beautiful but less unsettling than the Australian landscapes.

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61. Riverbend - Christina Slade

61. Riverbend - Christina Slade

“During the 1970s, Nolan’s River Bend sequence was hung above the dining hall in Bruce Hall, at the Australian National University. The snaking river, the glowing pellucid colours, shimmered over philosophical debates on identity, exam crises, heartbreak. The luminous curves of the river illuminated those years of learning, across all spheres.” Christina Slade is Vice-Chancellor of Bath Spa University, UK. She co-edited From Migrant to Citizen: Testing Language, Testing Culture, which was published in May 2010 and which, in the light of the Australian debate on citizenship tests, examines the themes of identity and cultural belonging underlying the political rhetoric of testing new citizens' knowledge of the language and culture of a nation. When exploring Australian culture and identity, one cannot overlook the infamous Australian outlaw Ned Kelly, the alter-ego, perhaps, of Australia’s most famous artist. Commenting on Nolan’s depiction of the bushranger, Christina comments that ‘Nolan’s Ned Kelly wears a helmet through which the Australian country appears, as though identity is absorbed into landscape. The country itself defines what it is to be Australian.’ Sidney Nolan, Riverbend, 1964-65, oil on board, nine panels (4th panel shown), The Australian National University Collection, © Sidney Nolan Trust

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60. Central Australia - Chris Drury

60. Central Australia - Chris Drury

"I am not a painter and have never been influenced by Nolan’s work as such but have found many parallels in the central Australian landscape works, of which I admit to only having seen a few, but the works which strike a chord are the ones with all that red ochre in them. As I sit here writing, I have a glass bottle filled with red earth taken from those same central Australian landscapes and I too have flown over them and stared down at those same mysterious landscapes. Then later I was lucky enough to have been taken out into these landscapes with Kado Muir, an aboriginal elder with Scottish/Native Australian ancestry and to spend a night out under the stars, with him and a handful of relatives discussing landscape, stars, art, animals and the effects of uranium mining. The next day we were shown animal tracks, waterholes, special sites and rock drawings – just the sort of things that would have interested Sidney. While I was in Canberra researching a sculpture to be made at ANU I was taken out to the Nilgiri hills by an aboriginal man who showed us more rock paintings there and the crazy markings of the scribbley bark beetle, all of which had parallels to Nolan's paintings, but to see the real difference in world view you have to go to the collection of Aboriginal works in the National Art Gallery, or indeed speak to an aboriginal person who will ask you to waft the smoke from a eucalypt fire over yourself, so that the land may know you. So I would say my connection is with landscape, soil, culture and people – both at The Rodd and in Australia: rural green green England and harsh deep red Australia – something which got deep into Nolan’s soul." I am an environmental artist, making site specific nature based sculpture, often referred to as Land Art or Art in Nature. I also work in art and Science. I make installations inside and make works on paper, works with maps, digital and video art, and works with mushrooms. Recent work includes a commission ‘The Wandering’ - formed on the site of the new Perth stadium - and ‘The Ways of Trees, Earth and Water’ - a collaborative commission in Canberra. http://chrisdrury.co.uk/ Sidney Nolan, Central Australia, 1950, oil on canvas, 121 x 90cm, University of York, © Sidney Nolan Trust.

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59. The Slip - Humphrey Ocean

59. The Slip - Humphrey Ocean

"This is something painting can do. It defies time and I can go on looking at it. Of course there are a number of tensions, one of them being graphic. It is late evening, certainly the last knockings of the day. There is still sufficient light for the horse to be illuminated while the thoughts of the people climbing the hill are given the privacy of darkness. We as fellow onlookers are among them. There is very little to be said. It is a beautiful image. I should add it is done in household Ripolin, as all his paintings of this period were, Nolan’s resonant way of saying he was Australian and doing something new." Humphrey Ocean is an artist and a Royal Academician. http://www.humphreyocean.com Sidney Nolan, The slip 1947, enamel paint on composition board, © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Gift of Sunday Reed 1977

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58. Season in Hell (Benjamin Britten) - Anne Bean

58. Season in Hell (Benjamin Britten) - Anne Bean

"In 2016, I was one of the artists in residence at SNT. During the last few nights of the residency, I spent the entire time, until early morning in Sidney Nolan’s exhibition studio wrestling with several large paintings that I had placed in the Hindwell river to absorb the clay and water-current patterns. This river, on the estate, formed part of the English/Welsh border. Whilst making this work, throughout the very physical process, I was aware of Nolan’s magnificent, filmic Riverbend series. His face stared out from a large B/W photo as I worked in his space. Sometimes he seemed calm, sometime troubled. I watched a film where he pointed out this English/Welsh border on his own property; the implications of ancient frictions and resolutions between these different psyches, different histories, different struggles, different mythologies. I had been told that he had a harness constructed in this studio exhibition space where I was working, so that he could 'fly' over the painting with his spray cans, helped by an assistant with various pulley rigs. This image of him 'flying' as he spray-painted thrilled and provoked me. I find his spray-painted Season In Hell (Benjamin Britten,) particularly disturbing and beguiling, in that it is simultaneously focussed and fizzing. This painting is a haunting, a dreamtime, a silent suppressed Munch scream. It brought to my mind a piece of writing I had written growing up in Africa where the sun seemed so powerful that it felt like an effervescence within the landscape, disorientating one’s gaze: 'my eyes weren't seeing but were what they saw'." July 2017, Anne Bean received Arts Council funding to work towards a publication on her work, commissioned by Live Art Development Agency and Intellect Books to cover some of her wide-ranging work of the last 48 years. http://annebeanarchive.com/ Sidney Nolan, Season in Hell (Benjamin Britten), 1982, 182.7 x 159.7 cm, spray paint on canvas, Collection of the Sidney Nolan Trust, © Sidney Nolan Trust. This work is showing as part of the exhibition 'Sidney Nolan' at the Ikon Gallery, Birmingham,until 3rd Spetember 2017.

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57. Faun, Woman, Rider, Horse - Mark Fraser

57. Faun, Woman, Rider, Horse - Mark Fraser

"I have never liked counterfactual history. It seems hard enough to work out what happened without adding the infinite permutations of what did not. Despite this, some ‘what ifs’ flit through my mind about Sidney Nolan’s life: if Sunday Reed had encouraged him to focus on poetry instead of painting (ironic perhaps that his strongest poems, decades later, were those that mauled their relationship); if he had ended up fighting in the New Guinea jungle like his near-contemporary Clifton Pugh, instead of guarding stores in the Wimmera; or if he had remained in Australia and not moved permanently to Britain. Another counterfactual came to light recently while researching an exhibition of Nolan’s 1955-56 Greek paintings. On the back of a small painting on paper, Faun, Woman, Rider, Horse dated 10 January 1956, Nolan wrote ‘Sculpture, black parts engraved’. The figure group, depicting a faun dragging a woman from a bolting horse, is set on a sculptural socle. Nolan the sculptor? I couldn’t find much in the literature or auction records: Woman and bird and Gun at the Contemporary Art Society exhibitions in 1941 and ’42 are intriguing; Lovers, a small, editioned, bronze from the late 1960s or early ‘70s appears to be based on a theme inspired by Robert Lowell’s poetry; a marble reputedly owned by Lord McAlpine that also relates to Lowell’s lovers; and a well-documented group of tiny gold sculptures of heads also from that period. I would include in this list the desiccated carcasses of drought animals that Nolan re-arranged in 1952 as ephemeral sculpture for his series of photographs. When I started looking at the back of works for other sculpture-related inscriptions I found multiple examples from the 1950s, ‘60s and ‘80s and subjects including Ned Kelly, burning drought carcasses, concentration camps and Greek themes. Nolan’s notes often provide additional information about the form these sculptures would take: ‘beaten copper’; ‘perhaps in giant form as a desert monument, and perhaps as a chair, with stretched hide seat’; ‘beaten iron with woven-plaited straw shield and enamelled (or colour Perspex) flag face’; ‘Project for burning carcases monument in Central Australia/Ayers Rock? Wave Hill’; ‘make in ceramic?’; ‘carved in onyx/jasper’; ‘sketch for jewelled sculpture’; ‘marble and bronze scale 3 metres high'; ‘metal (and shining) figure of Daedalus hanging from roof – on floor metal figure of the Minotaur’. The subject needs more research but in the meantime this counterfactual has opened my eyes to a new way of seeing Nolan’s work." Mark Fraser is an independent art advisor specialising in the work of Sidney Nolan. He previously worked as an art auctioneer and at the Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart. Current projects include two Nolan centenary exhibitions: Sidney Nolan: the Greek Series, at the Hellenic Museum, Melbourne, opening August 2017 Making History: Nolan at the Newsagent, at Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne, opening November 2017 Sidney Nolan, Faun, Woman, Rider, Horse, 1956, mixed media on paper, 25.4 x 30.5 cm, inscribed ‘Faun, Woman, Rider, Horse, Greek theme. Myth (127), Sculpture, black parts engraved’, © Sidney Nolan Trust. The work will be included in the Hellenic Museum exhibition opening this month in Melbourne.

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56. McMurdo Sound - Mike Clements

56. McMurdo Sound - Mike Clements

"It’s the purples and blues that struck me so forcibly when I first saw this painting exhibited at the Sidney Nolan Trust. How amazing that an icy, uninhabitable place should have such vibrant colour. Nolan’s relatively brief visit resulted in 60-plus Antarctica images, now scattered round the museums and galleries of the world, enabling so many people to gain an appreciation of a place that so few get the chance to visit." Mike Clements is printmaking tutor at the Sidney Nolan Trust and curator of numerous printmaking and artists’ book projects for the Trust, including the current Re-imagining the Laws of England and Wales (celebrating the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta). This is shortly to complete an 11 venue, two year tour of the UK. www.mikeclementsartist.com Sidney Nolan, McMurdo Sound, 1964, ripolin and oil on hardboard, 122 x 122 cm, © Sidney Nolan Trust

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55. Self portrait - Oliver McCall

55. Self portrait - Oliver McCall

"I’ll admit that until this year I’d never heard of Sidney Nolan. My first encounter with his work came shortly after I joined the exhibitions team at Ikon, Birmingham. One intensely grey February morning I made a trip, along with Ikon’s Director and Exhibitions Manager, to the Welsh border and The Rodd, now home to the Sidney Nolan Trust. We arrived to a cosy welcome – ushered in to one of the ancient outbuildings to a restorative cup of tea, and biscuits. It felt quite National Trust. The quintessentially English setting contrasted strikingly with the works we had come to see. Standing in the former grain barn surrounded by a multitude of Nolan’s large scale spray-painted portraits was a real pleasure; the bright oranges recalling Australian heat, the vivid greens, pinks, purples and blues looking as fresh as if they had been sprayed onto the canvases the previous day. One portrait in particular stood out - not housed with the rest, but kept in Nolan’s medieval barn-cum-studio – Nolan’s self-portrait. Now hanging at Ikon, this brooding image remains for me one of the most enigmatic in our exhibition. Here Nolan uses spray paint to dramatic effect. The swathe of electric blue gives the impression that his body is emerging phantasmagorically from the surrounding darkness. In contrast with many of the other works in the exhibition, particularly those depicting Nolan’s friends and sources of inspiration dating from 1982, his body appears more solid and somehow more isolated. Gory red lines like ritual markings cover his face and neck, underlining heavy eyes, running past his downcast mouth. Most unusually, Nolan has struck through his eyes with a single line of black spray paint, disrupting his own gaze. Perhaps this was an act of self-criticism. Perhaps, as has been suggested, it was in response to unfavourable reviews of his work of that time. Why would the artist scratch out his own eyes like that? That is part of the mystery of this portrait." Oliver McCall is Exhibitions Assistant at Ikon Gallery. The exhibition Sidney Nolan is on view at Ikon until 3rd September. Sidney Nolan, Self portrait, 1986, spray paint on canvas, 153 x 123 cm, Collection of the Sidney Nolan Trust, © Sidney Nolan Trust

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54. Landscape No.27 (Convalescence) - Suzanne Falkiner

54. Landscape No.27 (Convalescence) - Suzanne Falkiner

Nolan’s collaboration with Randolph Stow to provide images for the poet’s collection Outrider (1962) was close, but indirect. ‘I don’t remember that we ever talked in detail about particular poems or paintings, but we talked a lot in general. We were pretty much on the same wave-length in those days, and started ideas in each other. He called it “cross-fertilization”,’ Stow wrote in 1981. Nevertheless, as Nolan chose the individual poems to which each picture would be linked, he might have gleaned something of their painful inception. After a desolate period in the late 1950s that brought him close to death, Stow had written no new poems in four years, until the stimulation of working with Nolan reignited his creative fire. One of these new poems Nolan illustrated was ‘Landscapes’: A crow cries, and the world unrolls like a blanket; like a warm bush blanket, charred at the horizons.

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53. Randolph Stow - Suzanne Falkiner

53. Randolph Stow - Suzanne Falkiner

In March 1963 the poet and novelist Randolph Stow—‘Mick’ to his familiars—had resigned from teaching at Leeds University and, after wintering in Scotland, was on his way home to take up a position at the University of Western Australia. Stow had met Sidney Nolan in London early the previous year, after Geoffrey Dutton had suggested to the painter that he illustrate Stow’s poems for Dutton’s publication Australian Letters. The two became friends, sharing a passion for the poetry of Arthur Rimbaud and an abiding love of the Australian landscape. Stow, still in a fragile condition after a traumatic period in the Trobriand Islands a few years before, was also taken under Cynthia Nolan’s wing. ‘We were so late talking I finished staying the night. I do like Sidney - and Cynthia too, though she scares me a bit’, Mick wrote to his mother. To mark the friendship, Stow dedicated to Nolan one of his best-known poems, ‘The Land’s Meaning’: The love of man is a weed of the waste places. One may think of it as the spinifex of dry souls. A year later, as Stow left for a sojourn in Malta en route to Perth, Nolan presented him in turn with a small, impressionistic sketch on a cardboard postcard, apparently made while the artist was on a train, entitled ‘Stow as Rimbaud as Stow’. Inscribed on the back, ‘For Mick, Greetings from the Nolans, 24 March 1963’, the image was closely based on a portrait photograph of Rimbaud that strikingly resembled the young, blue-eyed Stow. ‘Nolan told Mick that while painting it he had two poets in mind, one being him and the other Rimbaud, the French poet’, Stow’s sister Helen recorded. Of the few portraits made of the notoriously shy Stow, this is the most evocative. Suzanne Falkiner is a writer. Her biography 'Mick: A Life of Randolph Stow' was published in 2016 by the University of Western Australia Publishing and was shortlisted for the 2017 National Biography Award. Her #Nolan100 choice is part of the University of Western Australia's 'My Collection' project. See also #Nolan100 - No. 38 and No. 23. Sidney Nolan, [Portrait of Randolph Stow], c. 1962-63, watercolour, 14x9 cm, The University of Western Australia Art Collection, Gift of Mrs Helen McArthur, 2011

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52, Greek Figures - Simon Pierse

52, Greek Figures - Simon Pierse

"Greek Figures is a small work in oil on paper measuring 164 x 212 mm or 6 ½ x 8 ¼ inches approximately. It is one of six small paintings given by Sidney Nolan to Ann Forsdyke (1913-2007) who was assistant director at the Whitechapel Gallery and, in the late 1960s, Nolan’s assistant in London.[1] Following her death in 2007, Forsdyke bequeathed her art collection to the Art Fund. This collection, with an estimated total value of over £500,000 and now known as the Ann Forsdyke Bequest, was distributed by the Art Fund to public galleries in Great Britain in 2010. Greek Figures is now in the School of Art Collection, Aberystwyth University.[2] Signed by Nolan and dated 1954, it carries an additional personal inscription (recto, lower right) in Nolan’s hand: 'Greetings, Mrs. Forsdyke, London, June 1957’. A similar inscription in black crayon is repeated on the back of the painting

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51. Figure at Harar - Andrew Turley

51. Figure at Harar - Andrew Turley

"There are only two works of art that have brought tears to my partner Rachael’s eyes. One was the roof of the Sistine Chapel. ‘Figure at Harar’ was the other. Emerging from the shadows of Sidney’s ‘African Journey’, the figure may not be pretty but she is powerful. Swathed and roped in a hooded robe, dead centre on a dark butter-rich background, she was published more than any other African work in 1963, appearing in Time magazine, art magazines, newspapers and books. She was also the face of “African Journey” in every major retrospective - Australia, UK, Germany, Stockholm, Dublin, Paris and Chicago – from 1963 until 1978. Leap forward to 2016 and Rachael and I were so seduced by her, we felt compelled to follow Sidney and Cynthia’s footsteps through the uneven, rubble-walled alleys of Harar, where hyenas once hunted down the sick and dying and still scavenge for butchers’ scraps today. Ethiopia and the ancient city were the last major leg of Sidney and Cynthia’s African journey – which stretched from early September through to November 1962. Cynthia wrote of the Ethiopian experience “we alternated between being cast down to the depths of human degradation then were faced with such beauty that our spirits soared”. Harar had been home to Sidney’s poet-hero Rimbaud, and on reaching the city his creative spirit did soar. His imagination was at fever pitch and Cynthia knew it. She wrote “Sidney also knew exactly what he wanted from this town (Harar), which he had first dreamed about when, as a boy, he was reading both the translation of the poems and those terrible cries of boredom, frustration and pain, Rimbaud’s letters to his mother”. Proving equal to the task, Sidney wove Rimbaud’s themes of angst, chaos and poverty deep into “Figure at Harar”. He shunned pictorial references used in many of his other Ethiopian works, instead creating a visual amalgam of Rimbaud’s prose - “in the dives where we used to get drunk, he would cry when he looked at the people around us – poverty’s cattle” - and his own Ethiopian vision - “the men, the women, the children were grey, a combination of unwanted ghosts and lepers clad in grave clothes”. This painting speaks to me because it is layered with vulnerability, menace and meaning. It is part of two older worlds finding a place in the new. And because, with single-minded clarity, Sidney took exactly what he needed from Harar to lock a pure, mythic presence behind “the cast iron logic of paint”."

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50. Going to Work, Rising Sun Hotel, 1948 - David Ferry

50. Going to Work, Rising Sun Hotel, 1948 - David Ferry

"Paintings have a way of drawing you in; a situation whereby all manner of senses; recollections and perhaps even portents reveal themselves. I was in Australia last year and visited a former miming town in South Australia, called Burra*. Burra is important for its industrial history (copper mining); it also gave me a glimpse of ‘former life’ outside the main cities of Melbourne and Sydney, which are very much Twenty First Century icons of business and contemporary super culture. Burra however, seemed mainly to exist through the past with the modern concession of a few coffee shops and a Tourist Office. I was able to obtain a ‘Burra Heritage Passport’ that enabled me to visit sites of historical and industrial importance, with your own ‘key’, so I was able to meander at leisure, and stop and explore the work and industrial constructions of early settlers (mainly Welsh and Cornish). It was a type of industrial archeological theme park, but somehow I was also very aware of the ‘present time’ coupled with the realization that I was so far away from home. I stayed in a hotel remarkably similar to the ‘Rising Sun’. Nolan’s painting ‘Rising Sun Hotel’* from 1948 offers a powerful reminder to me of my own footprint in Burra! There is a man and a bicycle (me) and the man (me) is standing in front of a building that was built at a time of Victorian industrial expansion but reminiscent of ‘Wild West’ films from an entirely different continent. All this completely displaced my already dysfunctional ‘away from home’ compass. To add further to the bewilderment of the familiar/unfamiliar, the film ‘Breaker Moran’* was filmed in locations around Burra and particularly at the Redruth Goal, (as though it was meant to be in the Transvaal!). The raw graphic power of Nolan’s ‘Rising Sun Hotel’, with its curious and evocative time/space anomalies (a type of human loneliness) assumes an evocation in me of a time past, but also a time and location recently experienced. Good paintings draw you in!"

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49. Myself - Simon Mundy

49. Myself - Simon Mundy

"Nolan was never afraid of revealing himself in his art but equally he liked to play hard to get, teasing the viewer or reader to guess whether the revelations are true or part of an elaborate game of false trails, fiction and reference back. You never know whether the enigma is there for you to decode or whether the process will just confuse you even more. Confusion is deliberate but then so is the idea that truth moves, shape-shifts and is never definite. This last and surely great self-portrait is everything a summing-up should be. It is a good likeness – he stands with a half smile as a man in late middle age wearing a tie which is a fair approximation to one I remember him wearing at the time. Even here he teases, though; the John Lennon glasses and the shock of white hair are close to his own but could be David Hockney or Andy Warhol's too. The sky is blue but on either side crimson clouds threaten his ears. Does he hide behind the black prison of Ned Kelly's mask, forced into staccato lines with the violence of graffiti, or is he emerging from it? For this and the background he uses the spray paint that was the symbol of 1980s antisocial behaviour but that he had been using as an artist since the age of fifteen. If Myself was a summation, painted at The Rodd four years before he died, it needs an introduction and that is why it sits on the cover of my short biography in which I try to do just that. The man I knew was very like the one in this picture, perhaps even more so than the man I have uncovered since. He would have enjoyed my ambivalence." Simon Mundy, poet, novelist, Sidney Nolan, Myself, 1988, spray paint and oil on hardboard, 122 x 91.5 cm, Collection of the Sidney Nolan Trust, © Sidney Nolan Trust

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48. Crane - Brian Adams

48. Crane - Brian Adams

"For someone who had the very good fortune to be associated with Sidney Nolan for thirty years, both professionally and socially, and being familiar with much of his prolific output, selecting a favourite is difficult without gravitating to one of his chefs-d’oeuvre such as Kelly, Mrs Fraser or the monumental Anzac series. With two international TV documentaries (Nolan at Sixty and Such is Life) together with a brace of biographical studies (Such is Life and Sidney Nolan’s Odyssey) I’ve decided to take the reverse direction by choosing a deceptively simple sketch from the 1977 tele-retrospective filmed on worldwide locations. In Kenya, Sidney recalled his “African Journey” paintings which became Nolan’s first selling exhibition in London in 1963 with purchases by the Royal Family at a private preview. The public found an affinity with the pictures, however most critics regarded them as something of a fraud by abandoning his Australian roots and replacing kangaroos with zebras and koalas with apes. Eric Newton even suggested, presumably tongue in cheek, that the artist was a modern-day Baron Munchausen and fabricated his whole show without ever setting foot on the African continent. But fellow painter Francis Bacon complimented the artist personally and he and Kenneth Clark (who subsequently wrote and narrated Nolan at Sixty in 1977) were not among the detractors. Clark commented for my film: ‘He didn’t paint the African landscape, but the people and animals. He painted monkeys looking like old, philosophical men, and old men and women looking like monkeys. He wanted to show the stoicism of survival’. Nothing illustrated that perceptive observation better than an unexpected incident that happened when filming Nolan, with sketchbook and crayons to hand, sitting on a river bank close to Nairobi drawing a couple of handsome blue cranes, a metre high, feeding in the shallows. Suddenly they were attacked by a predatory crocodile which appeared from nowhere and one of them ended up in its mouth as a flurry of blue feathers splattered with blood, while its partner watched the tragedy disconsolately from the safety of the bank. Nolan’s image of the violent encounter was captured in less than two minutes using brown, blue and red oil crayons, including a sinister red dot for the assailant’s beady eye. Later, I had that page from the sketchbook framed to place on the wall of my study as a reminder of the times we spent together and how a consummate artist could achieve with the simplest of sketches the message Kenneth Clark alluded to, not only about the stoicism of survival for all creatures great and small in Africa, but also as the universal truth Sidney also enshrined in the spirit of Ned Kelly’s final utterance before being hanged at Melbourne Gaol: ‘Such is Life!’" Brian Adams OAM, Australian television producer and author. Ten published books include biographic studies of Sidney Nolan - "Sidney Nolan: Such is Life" and "Sidney Nolan's Odyssey: A Life". Also biographies of Dame Joan Sutherland - "La Stupenda", "Portrait of an Artist: biography of Sir William Dobell" and the 18th century botanist Sir Joseph Banks - "The Flowering of the Pacific". Now lives in the South of France. Sidney Nolan, Crane, 1977, crayon on paper.

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47. Central Australia - Leanne Santoro

47. Central Australia - Leanne Santoro

"Central Australia is one of the highlights of the AGNSW’s Nolan, and indeed Australian art, collection. Emerging from Nolan’s 1949 trip to Central Australia, the aerial perspective, with the rocky landscape disappearing into a far-off horizon reveals the monumental scale of the Australian outback. Flying with pilot Eddie Connellan as he delivered mail on his long runs, Nolan was afforded an aerial perspective of the landscape, a viewpoint which had so impressed him two years earlier on his flights over Queensland and Fraser Island. Nolan was one of the first non-indigenous artists to paint the vast, remote interior of the continent at a time when the majority of the population had never seen the country’s centre. 'Today went on a mail flight for four hundred miles… It is a simple matter to trace in this old waterless and eroded surface of the earth the dreaming nature and philosophy of the Aborigines. In the morning the light on the hills was like gauze… Transparent and at the same time impenetrable, a fitting paradox for those who would look long at it and attempt to look through it to the coloured rocks and hills themselves. One must accept it as such only a little of it can be painted. The same as other things, only here the categories of light are clearly defined. Just so much you can do and just so much you cannot. It would be a mistake to erect any theories. Time and space are obviously welded together under those conditions here. Both are old.' Sidney Nolan diary notes, Alice Springs, 28 June 1949, Jinx Nolan papers. The red ochre of the desert in Central Australia provides a striking colour change from much of the Australian landscape painting which had preceded it. The rich reds of the soil and lunar-like craggy outcrops must have been quite a shock to the city-dwelling art lovers accustomed to bucolic pastoral scenes. For me, the most striking thing about this series is comparing Nolan’s photographs of the region with the paintings. The forms of the ancient land with its craters and shadows have been brilliantly rendered; there is little abstracted. Nolan has captured the isolated beauty of Central Australia’s colours and forms with honesty and great skill." Leanne Santoro, Assistant curator, Australian art, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia Central Australia, 1950, Ripolin enamel and oil on hardboard, 122 x 152.5 cm. Purchased with funds provided by the Nelson Meers Foundation 2004. The Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

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46. Face of the Damned - Kate McMillan

46. Face of the Damned - Kate McMillan

"Throughout his career, Nolan addressed the repression and omission of violence against Aboriginal peoples in his work. At the end of his career, he was heavily influenced by the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, a problem that still remains very much unresolved. This work and others portray Aboriginal prisoners and the legacy of invasion that haunts contemporary Australia. Growing up as an art student and artist in Australia, this was an aspect of Nolan's practice that was completely absent from the mythology around his work. It wasn't until I moved to Britain that I began to learn about a far more nuanced artist, one who was experimental, innovative and ahead of his time. It is hard to believe that he was working on these paintings, showing at Ikon Gallery this month, as an elderly man with a spray can, addressing issues that white Australia still struggles to confront today." Dr Kate McMillan is a London based artist, who has spent most of her life on the west coast of Australia. Her work investigates histories that are overlooked and forgotten, largely through film, sound and sculpture. She teaches contemporary art at King's College, London www.katemcmillan.net Sidney Nolan, Face of the Damned, 1982, spray paint on canvas, 182.7 x 159.5 cm, © Trustees of the Sidney Nolan Trust On show at Ikon until 3rd September 2017.

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45. Luna Park - Bill Granger

45. Luna Park - Bill Granger

"It’s been over thirty years since I’ve lived in Melbourne but Sidney Nolan’s painting Luna Park takes me instantly back to my eighth birthday where I celebrated by terrifying myself and my friends on the so-called Big Dipper and Little Dipper, the majestic, if somehow fragile, roller coasters from the twenties. The rickety amusement railways preside over the landscape of St Kilda, in urban beachside Melbourne, and this part of Port Phillip Bay, which can be bleak and sombre especially when the weather is grey or gloomy. I spent most weekends of my childhood playing in the parks close where Luna Park’s presence over the quite bare foreshore of St Kilda is dominant and ever-so-slightly sinister. While I normally associate Nolan’s work with the desolate and empty Australian bush, this captures that isolation but in urban Melbourne. Instead of gum trees in a landscape, here the man-made structure of Luna Park is set against the predominately slate greys and blues of the Bay, and it similarly captures both the presence of the amusement park, the sky and the sea. Stylistically completely different from his later signature work, the palette and the way he captures light and landscape is distinctly Nolan. It gives me a visceral feeling of longing due to the accuracy of ambience of that very particular part of Australia that he represents." Bill Granger, chef: Granger & Co Sidney Nolan, Luna Park, 1941, 49 x 59 cm, Ripolin on canvas mounted on board, © Trustees of the Sidney Nolan Trust, photo © Agnew's, London / Bridgeman Images

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44. Island - Nick Yelverton

44. Island - Nick Yelverton

Sidney Nolan’s enigmatic Fraser Island series continues to unfurl and intrigue seventy years after it was painted in October 1947. Following the completion of his first Kelly series in mid-1947 Nolan ventured north to Queensland, seeking a break from Melbourne and new subjects to paint. After learning of Fraser Island at Heide, and reading about the shipwreck of the Stirling Castle in 1836 and the legend of Eliza Fraser and David Bracefell, Nolan decided to visit twice that year. Fraser Island made a significant impression on Nolan. He wrote to patron John Reed: “I doubt I have given good picture really of the island, it has been more intense than I have written; the psyche of the place has bitten me deeply and I feel involved with it in a way that I cannot explain easily …”. On his second trip, Nolan painted twelve works on Masonite probably procured from an abandoned army building, and later received bad press for his perceived misuse of precious building resources following the war. Island, one of five known surviving works from the series, provides an insight into Fraser Island’s “psyche” which Nolan failed to describe in his letter to Reed, but managed to channel into his existentialist imagery. Pictured is a lonely, naked man stood ominously in either a beach or creek on the island. According to Nolan this figure was “modelled” on a forester named Norm who he had boarded with, however this subject’s identity was never disclosed by the artist. Appearing like a lost soul in a watery grave, we are led to believe that this fellow is a perished crew member aboard the Stirling Castle, or Bracefell still reeling from his alleged betrayal by Fraser, who reported the escaped convict to the authorities, even though he had rescued her in exchange for a pardon. Knowing Nolan’s penchant for drawing upon his own tumultuous personal circumstances in his work, this man could also be an allegoric depiction of his brother Raymond, who had drowned whilst serving in the navy at Cooktown in 1945, or even the artist. We will probably never know – and that is what makes this painting so alluring. Island is currently on show at the Art Gallery of New South Wales as part of a commemorative Nolan display celebrating what would have been his 100 birthday. Nick Yelverton, Assistant curator, Australian art, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia Sidney Nolan, Island, 1947, 77 x 105 cm, Ripolin on hardboard, © Trustees of the Sidney Nolan Trust

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43. Brett Whiteley - Jonathan Watkins

43. Brett Whiteley - Jonathan Watkins

"In 1982 I was teaching art history at the University of Sydney alongside Jack (Elwyn) Lynn, the artist and critic close to Sidney Nolan. Jack had recently written a catalogue essay for Illuminations, an exhibition of a new series of spray paintings by Nolan at the Lanyon Gallery in Canberra, and somehow he convinced me to make the long road trip to see it. I remember the whole thing vividly, who I was with, the music we played on the way, the smoky smell of the hotel room where we stayed …. Above all, I have strong memories of the show. Such freshness, such spontaneous exhalations of paint across expanses of canvas, the likenesses conjured up out of colour. I bought a catalogue, a slim volume with a reproduction of Nolan’s portrait of Brett Whiteley on the cover, and kept it for many years as a souvenir, a memento of the road trip, of my friendship with Jack and, I suppose, the fact that I first met Brett Whiteley around that time. On a Sydney Harbour ferry, wearing sunglasses, stoned – him, not me – five years before I met Nolan, but that’s another story ... Time whooshes by. Several house/career moves later, in 2008, impulsively getting rid of stuff, I sold off much of my collection of art books and with it the Lanyon Gallery Illuminations catalogue, probably thinking that it would never be useful to me, but for some reason I kept an image of its cover deeply etched in my memory. Last year at the Sidney Nolan Trust, set up in the artist’s last home on the Welsh border, I saw another actual copy of catalogue, and was immediately transported back to Canberra, 1982. There again, staring out of the no-nonsense graphic design, was Whiteley’s famously angelic face, a bit troubled, detached, a kind of psycho-symphony in blue. It would never have occurred to my twenty-five year old self that more than thirty-five years later, not far from where Nolan was making his spray paintings in the 1980s, that I would be making an exhibition of them to mark the centenary of his birth. It is a huge privilege, and something very personal. This summer, as I walk through Ikon’s first floor galleries to my office, I’ll be touched by a daily reunion with Brett Whiteley." Jonathan Watkins, Director of Ikon Gallery, Birmingham. Sidney Nolan, Brett Whiteley, 1982, 184 x 162cm, spray paint on canvas, © Trustees of the Sidney Nolan Trust. On show at Ikon until 3rd September 2017.

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42. Roses in a Merric Boyd Vase - Jack Galloway

42. Roses in a Merric Boyd Vase - Jack Galloway

“In the early 1980s my wife Tessa (Mary Nolan's daughter) and I used to visit Sid and Mary at their London flat by the Thames. That was where I first saw this beautiful painting, Roses in a Merric Boyd Pot. It was painted not long after Sid came to stay with Mary in Herefordshire. Merric Boyd (1888-1959) was Mary's father, a renowned Australian potter. To me, the painting conveys a deep serenity and reflects the joy and harmony Sid and Mary enjoyed in their early days together. Sid and I shared a great love of Rimbaud's poetry and we often talked about his work together.” Flowers by Arthur Rimbaud (1854-1891) From a golden slope--among silk ropes, grey veils, green velvets, and crystal discs that blacken like the bronze of the sun I watch the foxglove open on a carpet of filigree, eyes and hair. Pieces of yellow gold scattered over agate, mahogany pillars supporting an emerald dome, bouquets of white satin and delicate sprays of rubies surround the water-rose. Like some god's enormous blue eyes staring from within a silhouette of snow, sea and sky attract a crowd of strong young roses to the marble steps. Jack Galloway, actor Sidney Nolan, Flowers in a Vase, c.1978-82, Ripolin on board, 91.5cm x 48cm, © Trustees of the Sidney Nolan Trust 42. Roses in a Merric Boyd Vase

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41. Pretty Polly Mine - Michael Brand

41. Pretty Polly Mine - Michael Brand

“Pretty Polly Mine powerfully evokes the harshness of much of our landscape and how we tackled our often tenuous relationship with it in the post-WWII years. Yet there is also the quixotic human figure, looking both out of place and entirely at home. This is one of the first Nolans purchased by the Gallery - just a year after it was painted - and it is worth remembering that the then director was harshly attacked by the Board of Trustees for purchasing such a modern work.” Dr Michael Brand is Director of the Art Gallery of New South Wales Sidney Nolan: Pretty Polly Mine, 1948, Ripolin on hardboard, 91 x 122 cm, © AGNSW

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40. Aboriginal Girl - Jennie Milne

40. Aboriginal Girl - Jennie Milne

I moved to The Rodd in June 1998 with my husband and our young daughter. We had only visited once before at Mary’s invitation to see what we thought of it all and if we would be interested in helping her to get the Trust going after it had pretty much lain dormant since Sidney’s death. Neither of us knew Nolan’s work or the dramas that we were letting ourselves in for but we were intrigued. Our visit had been an intimate and warm couple of days as we got to know each other, talking, eating, laughing, the first of a great many equally intimate and very special times in the ensuing years. Mary introduced us to Nolan’s iconic paintings but as we were to discover they were just the tip of the creative iceberg. For me, the spray paintings and abstracts are that part of Nolan’s work that physically move me and Aboriginal Girl in particular. I saw it first not long after we moved to The Rodd. It was at the front of a stack in the paintings store and being short myself, I was literally whacked in the face by the scale and intensity of the shimmering colours. I’ve seen this painting many times over the years, close up and at a distance, either in the store or at the far end of tithe barn gallery, the aboriginal girl not disappearing into a hot and dusty landscape but bold and visible, vibrating with strong colour. Mary was never keen for paintings from this series to be shown for exhibitions we held at the Trust in the early years. She thought they would be too much for people and too soon after Sidney’s death. This painting always takes me by surprise, always stops me in my tracks and I experience the same intense sensation I had felt when we first met in the painting store. I can’t describe what that is. It’s a feeling. Jennie Milne, designer, friend, archivist and PA to Mary Nolan 1998 to 2014 Sidney Nolan, Aboriginal Girl, 1986, spray paint on canvas, 184 x 161 cm © The Trustees of the Sidney Nolan Trust

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39. Bathers - Lesley Harding

39. Bathers - Lesley Harding

Sidney Nolan Bathers 1943 enamel on canvas 64 x 76.5 cm Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne Bequest of John and Sunday Reed 1982 Born and raised in Melbourne’s bayside suburb of St Kilda, Sidney Nolan often drew on familiar subjects and motifs such as the local swimming baths, foreshore, pier and eponymous fairground, Luna Park, as the subjects for his artistic investigations. Bathers, one of several memory-based works on this otherwise classical theme, captures the heat, haze and spirit of the Australian summer in typically laconic style. The flattened picture plane and disjunctive scale of Bathers pays homage to the work of cubist and purist painter Fernand Léger. This is most obvious in the abbreviated details of the picture: the black outlines, tricolour towels and flag, and the exaggerated stripes of the slatted platform. Similarly the reductive spatial compositions of Mondrian can be found in the painting’s structure; take the figures away and the pier, decking, sea and sky become a constructive geometric abstraction in panes of barely modulated colour. However Nolan had already been experimenting with perspective and form in his paintings of the Wimmera district, with which Bathers chronologically coincides. In 1942 he abandoned the abstract idiom he had hitherto pursued, and turned his attention to the stories and distinctive aesthetic of his Australian context. He had been conscripted into the army in April and stationed in north-western Victoria’s vast wheat belt. With ample time to paint, a period of great advancement in his work commenced—he adapted and expanded upon recent developments in international modernism and applied them to the local setting. It has been said that Nolan’s paintings from this time helped transform the way Australians envisaged their native land. Taking as his subject the shimmering golden plains of his immediate environment, Nolan shunned conventional perspective and introduced contiguous flat areas in the space of his pictures—tilting the horizontal surfaces vertically and setting the horizon line high. He wrote to his Melbourne art benefactor Sunday Reed of his revelations, ‘it came simply that if you imagined the land going vertically into the sky it would work’. Such devices could be neatly adapted to the modern exigencies of urban architecture and life as well, and Nolan soon elaborated on this emblematic style of expression using the St Kilda images from his childhood. By exploiting the tension between flat and modelled shapes, and reducing his images to their essential forms, Nolan sought to relieve art from the decorative or ornamental, and get to the very heart of things—revealing in his own inimitable way what is fundamental or even universal about the everyday. Lesley Harding Curator Heide Museum of Modern Art

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38. The Cardplayers - Nevin Jayawardena

38. The Cardplayers - Nevin Jayawardena

This work by Sidney Nolan concentrates on the characters in the painting, rather than the architecture. Nolan has utilized the chiaroscuro technique, where he uses strong tonal contrasts between light and dark to model the different forms for dramatic effect. This sombre effect is further emphasized by the facial expressions of the characters themselves. The painting depicts six different characters, most of whom are engaged in the game of cards. It illustrates two men immersed in this mundane activity, with three other spectators studiously intent on the game and one man who seems to be more removed from the activity. The five in the left half of the painting all appear to be focused closely on the game of cards. There is no excitement, no melodrama, nor conversation, rather, Nolan’s painting portrays six stone-faced figures of muted emotion in a rather simplified setting. Card playing is a popular theme that has been used in other paintings within the Australian ‘Bush’ genre. Typically, it aims to emphasize the universality of life activities that exist amongst countrymen, perhaps alien to an urban environment. This painting captures an eerie yet calm spirit of the bush land, through its tone, technique and the symbolism of card playing creates a sense of concentration and also timelessness. For me, the painting communicates a narrative about men who are quietly passing the time, happy enough with the hand that life has dealt them. However, there is one who is not content with his situation. His juxtaposition, accentuated by the centre wooden pillar that separates him from the crowded space of five men marks him out as someone who wants something more or something different as he lingers beside the open window. For me, he represents escape and freedom from the more conventional and confined left half.

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37. Rose in Coffee Pot - Professor Anthony Collier

37. Rose in Coffee Pot - Professor Anthony Collier

Professor Anthony Collier Driving from Birmingham twenty years ago to walk on Offa’s Dyke we passed a sign outside Presteigne saying “Sidney Nolan Exhibition”. Cynically I thought it’s a small gallery with a few prints trading on his name. Thankfully we followed the sign arriving at an amazing array of medieval barns set around a courtyard. There were fifteen or twenty oil paintings by Sidney hanging in the Tithe Barn. Spellbinding. A magical moment. Alone in beautiful countryside with Tate Gallery quality paintings. No one about, just us in this extraordinary space. Etched most clearly in my mind was a superb painting of a vase of flowers on a mantelpiece. A man appeared who talked enthusiastically about the paintings and the Trust’s future. This was Anthony Plant and the first of many inspirational people I have been privileged to meet through the Trust over the last ten years. Sidney left two great legacies, his work and his long term vision for the Trust. It’s that vision - the future of the Trust as a great international centre for experiment, reflection and development linking with neighbouring urban and rural communities that sets me on fire. The creative role this historic place can play globally and locally is enormous. Is anywhere comparable? Professor Anthony Collier Anthony is a Trustee of the Sidney Nolan Trust. He was Professor and Dean of Faculty of the Built Environment at the University of Central England (now Birmingham City University). He is the founding Director and Chair of The Bond Company in Birmingham, is an exhibiting artist and is active in the charitable and arts sectors in the West Midlands. Still Life with Coffee Jug and Rose

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36. Luna Park - Paula Dredge

36. Luna Park - Paula Dredge

While preparing paintings for the Sidney Nolan retrospective exhibition in 2007, I was cataloguing a collection of paints from Nolan’s studio in Wahroonga, Sydney, given to the Art Gallery of NSW by his daughter Jinx Nolan. No traditional artist’s oil paints among them, they were a time capsule of household paint technology from the mid 20th century and included many paint trade names which were entirely unknown in their content; Ripolin, Dulux, Kemtone and Surtint. When I was asked by the exhibition curators what Nolan’s paintings might be made from, I was filled with uncertainty. Luna Park for example had previously been catalogued as enamel and as oil, but was it the glossy Ripolin paint he had been so well known for using? Or could it be Dulux or even artist’s oil paint? After scientific analysis of the paints from the Wahroonga studio and then the works themselves, the paint medium of Luna Park was revealed as something else entirely; nitrocellulose lacquer. The most popular brand of nitrocellulose paint, Duco, had been developed in the 1920s as a paint for motor cars and then signage and even for recolouring leather shoes during the depression of the 1930s. This would have been a paint type familiar to Nolan from his work making signs for cars in a factory at the age of 13 and displays for the Fayrefield Hat company in Melbourne through the 1930s. Usually applied with spray guns, nitrocellulose paints dried quickly and were difficult to work with a brush. How Nolan could have painted Luna Park using such a fast-drying paint is still mysterious, but the need to paint fast and have his paint dry faster appears to have been a quest he pursued throughout his life. Nolan moved on from nitrocellulose to work with other household paints such as Dulux in 1942, (the first synthetic paint made from polyester), Ripolin in 1943, (oils cooked with driers) then mixing his own paints from ‘white glue’, PVA, in the 1950s and alkyd gel medium in the 1960s. Now, as I work through the hundreds of items left in his studio at his house in the U.K., The Rodd, it is the commitment to any type of paint or additive which sped drying and required new technical challenges in application, that appears to have inspired Nolan. Perhaps it is no surprise that he took to paint in spray cans in 1981 before they became the well-known medium of street artists. The spray cans dominate his last studio, set out on tables for access to a range of colours like a traditional artist’s palette. No doubt he took to the spray as a technique harking back to his first jobs, but now wielded two-handed like a double set of guns firing at the canvas. The spray cans produced spectacular effects of coloured sky and water, likenesses in portraits and huge abstracts with intense colours and powdery matt surfaces; paint effects controlled only by the distance and position of the cans in steady hands. Dr Paula Dredge is the Head of Paintings Conservation at the Art Gallery of New South Wales. Her PhD thesis was an analytical and historical study of the household paints used by Sidney Nolan from 1939 to 1953. This study continues in the year of Nolan’s centenary, to encompass the following four decades of his practice through a research residency at Nolan’s studio: The Rodd Sidney Nolan, Luna Park, 1941, 67.0 x 84.0 cm, nitrocellulose lacquer on canvas, © The Trustees of the Sidney Nolan Trust

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35. The Emu Hunt - Roger Law

35. The Emu Hunt - Roger Law

EMU HUNT by Sidney Nolan 1949 Before 1998 the only Australian artist I was familiar with was Sidney Nolan and I was not at all sure what to make of him. During my time as a caricaturist working in London I was au fait with contemporary European and American art but while living in Australia (from the late ‘98 to 2011) I was delighted to discover a wealth of Aussie art that I had been utterly unaware of – Ian Fairweather and Rosalie Gascoigne for starters. But I still did not know what to make of Sidney Nolan. The more of Nolan’s paintings I saw the more I realised he could be curated and presented as one of the best ever Australian artists or simply the worst. I was fascinated. Nolan was so good and so bad; so prolific and refreshingly unselective. I began drawing and travelling around that sunburnt country, up to Arnhem Land and down to the Coorong, from coastal Broome to the red interior, and the penny finally began to drop. The Australian landscape was Nolan’s preoccupation. But looking at his paintings with a European eye they are hard to understand without the experience of that glittering, unfinished, fragile landscape that is Terra Australis. Initially Nolan caught my attention with his myth-making and populist subject matter (the stories of Ned Kelly and shipwrecked Mrs Fraser). Being an anti-establishment artist myself he had me on side. His tabloid tales nailed down the larrikin attitude I love about Australians. The ‘Emu Hunt’ captures all of that. Jewel-like parrots perch in the scrappy Eucalypt in the centre of the picture – the remains of the Garden of Eden. The empty landscape and expansive sky are quintessentially Australian and of course the image is very funny. © Roger Law 287 words SIDNEY NOLAN 1917-1992 The Emu Hunt 1949 enamel paint on composition board 91.1 x 121.4 cm Image courtesy of Sotheby’s Australia

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34. Peter Grimes's Apprentice - George Vass

34. Peter Grimes's Apprentice - George Vass

"I absolutely adore ‘Peter Grimes’s Apprentice’ which is a relatively late work from the 1970s. For me it really encapsulates the sense of hopelessness of Grimes’ second apprentice who, in Britten’s opera, dies after falling off a cliff into the sea. It was painted for the 30th Aldeburgh Festival and is one of the results of a long and fruitful relationship Nolan had with composer Benjamin Britten. Being a musician myself, I always hear Britten’s music when viewing this painting." Sidney Nolan was founding President of the Presteigne Festival – George and Sidney met a number of times at The Rodd (George having been associated with the Festival since 1989), and since his appointment as artistic director in 1992, George has continued to forge an important link between the Sidney Nolan Trust and the Presteigne Festival, with annual exhibitions and other Nolan-based events. George Vass ARAM, conductor and artistic director of the Presteigne Festival (of which Sideny Nolan was the founding President).

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33. Self Portrait - Denise Mimmocchi

33. Self Portrait - Denise Mimmocchi

Self portrait 1943 In 1943, the young Nolan painted himself as an artist ready for combat. Confronting the viewer with a penetrating gaze, his brushes and palette are poised as his weaponry. He stands guarding his Wimmera pictures, products of the pictorial revelations with which he revolutionised his landscape painting. Their colours are infused on his skin; the paint of his palette is that of his warrior markings, as if the artist and his work are one and the same. Nolan’s self-portrait was painted while on military duty. Stationed in the vast landscapes of the Wimmera plains safeguarding food stores from May 1942, the war may have appeared remote. But the Japanese bombing of Darwin earlier that year, and the lurking threat of active combat, made the peril real and present. The portrait projects this sense of menace but also signals another battleground that has the artist defending the terms of his modern creativity. Nolan’s war-time service would ironically provide a platform for a period of intense experimentation and existential investigation. He not only developed his radical vision of the Australian environment from the Wimmera flatlands, but also first tested the expressive potential of Ripolin paint. Self portrait is telling of how he seized on the enamel’s flat, saturated finish to augment the power of his imagery. Nolan would claim his later Ripolin-clad Kelly figure as a masked alter-ego. While the face of Nolan’s earlier self portrait is also mask-like, it exposes something of a raw and anxious emotional state beneath, while nonetheless determining a figure that is resolutely, and fiercely, avant-garde. Denise Mimmocchi Art Gallery of New South Wales Self portrait 1943 In 1943, the young Nolan painted himself as an artist ready for combat. Confronting the viewer with a penetrating gaze, his brushes and palette are poised as his weaponry. He stands guarding his Wimmera pictures, products of the pictorial revelations with which he revolutionised his landscape painting. Their colours are infused on his skin; the paint of his palette is that of his warrior markings, as if the artist and his work are one and the same. Nolan’s self-portrait was painted while on military duty. Stationed in the vast landscapes of the Wimmera plains safeguarding food stores from May 1942, the war may have appeared remote. But the Japanese bombing of Darwin earlier that year, and the lurking threat of active combat, made the peril real and present. The portrait projects this sense of menace but also signals another battleground that has the artist defending the terms of his modern creativity. Nolan’s war-time service would ironically provide a platform for a period of intense experimentation and existential investigation. He not only developed his radical vision of the Australian environment from the Wimmera flatlands, but also first tested the expressive potential of Ripolin paint. Self portrait is telling of how he seized on the enamel’s flat, saturated finish to augment the power of his imagery. Nolan would claim his later Ripolin-clad Kelly figure as a masked alter-ego. While the face of Nolan’s earlier self portrait is also mask-like, it exposes something of a raw and anxious emotional state beneath, while nonetheless determining a figure that is resolutely, and fiercely, avant-garde. Denise Mimmocchi Art Gallery of New South Wales

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32. Tarred and Feathered - Nick Cave

32. Tarred and Feathered - Nick Cave

Sidney Nolan’s paintings mostly tell stories and the stories are often of outcasts and outsiders. This gloriously anarchic painting tells the story of Riverina Dick, who had been tarred and feathered and cast out of the town. Tarring and feathering was the ultimate public humiliation; a shunning, often inflicted on an individual with the tacit approval of the locals. Little is known of the details of the story, but surely the prostrate woman was is in some way at the heart of the misadventure. Looking at the abject Riverina Dick, one cannot help but see Jesus escorted by soldiers on his way to Calvary, isolated, spurned and full of thorns, like the Grunewald Christ – all under a merciless Australian sky.

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31. Ned Kelly and Policeman - Daniel Crawshaw

31. Ned Kelly and Policeman - Daniel Crawshaw

I was treated to a novel retelling of Kelly’s downfall on a Gippsland roadside a few years ago: “Ahhh they weren’t bad boys, it was that bloody Fitzpatrick” the farmer drawled, arm hanging from the window “They called on my great aunt…found a blacksmith up in New South Wales...poor buggers....they shot Ned in the legs” As myths go Ned Kelly is a hard one to beat and the handmade armour a masterstroke, offering an image of the anti-hero in a cast iron frame. While notoriously illusive, the Kelly gang were ubiquitous and anecdotal sites of interest cover a vast area beyond Glenrowan, where I stopped to pick up a souvenir tea towel. It could be said that Nolan took the Kelly myth and literally rode with him through all kinds of painterly twists, developing a rich, playful and disjointed narrative. Kelly is the trickster, constantly popping up in paintings of different compositional guises and underpinning Nolan’s haunting, visceral Australian landscapes. In ‘Kelly and Policemen’ Nolan adopts a tall format and a high horizon reminiscent of the Northern Renaissance. Kelly’s iconic helmet becomes a keyhole in the lower composition. The policemen, feeble and fragile feel like they might slip, along with the subtle suggestions of trees, from the bottom of the painting. Encountering this work at Pallant House recently I was struck that Nolan handles the medium of paint as if it is being subjected to some kind of mesmeric external control; the oil dragged, the light from within unique and luminous. I was reminded of my drive on out to Broken Hill, gripping the wheel against the hypnotic power of the outback.

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30. Girl - Amelda Langslow

30. Girl - Amelda Langslow

My family love this painting my father, Sidney, painted when he was twenty-four. It is of my mother, Elizabeth, when she was pregnant. Entitled ‘Girl,’ it is dated 1941 – the year of my birth. It is a deceptively simple, graphic and monochromatic image of pregnancy that draws your eye to the heart. As my young parents separated shortly after I was born, perhaps the grey palette represents pain but luckily the little heart prevailed. Although it was some years before my father and I were able to be together, we remained close until his death in 1992. I like to think that this painting, undistracted by detail, represents an almost ultrasound image of our origins.

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29. Thames - Sir John Tooley

29. Thames - Sir John Tooley

I first met Sidney in the mid-1950s, a short time after his arrival in England with his wife Cynthia when they came to take up residence in the UK. He was standing at the end of the bar at the Royal Opera House, a favourite spot, where he was only too happy to be engaged in conversation. By this stage in his artistic development his thoughts and ambitions were roving widely over the world and he was meeting many distinguished people of cultural standing who were interested in him as an artist and who welcomed him into their circle. One of these was Benjamin Britten. Sidney's passion for music naturally drew him to the composer, but he was drawn not only to the music but also to Ben's intellectual ideas. Sidney much admired the set-up in Snape, with its music festival and the opportunities for providing a stimulating artistic environment, particularly in a rural setting. He wanted to create something similar and spent years, frequently in conversation with Ben, who became a lifelong friend, formulating ideas as to how another such artistic centre might be established. It took a long time to achieve, but by the 1980s, with his third wife Mary, he at last managed to buy a suitable house and land in Herefordshire where he could create an organic farm and, potentially, a centre for the arts. This was The Rodd. Meanwhile Sidney had forged a close relationship with the Royal Opera House and he and I became good friends. In 1964, to Sidney's delight, he was invited by Kenneth MacMillan to design the sets and costumes for a new production of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring. The subject matter and the vivid score provided just the right inspiration for Sidney. The production was a huge success and contributed to the growing recognition of Sidney Nolan as an important theatre designer. That production, with Sidney's designs, is still running to this day at Covent Garden. Once Sidney had settled with Mary at the Rodd, he moved to establish a Trust which would secure the future of the organic farm, the promotion of his work and the execution of his educational ideals. He asked me if I would be a trustee, and sometime after his death Mary asked me if I would become Chairman. These were roles I took on with great pleasure for some twenty years. Sidney would have been thrilled to see the extent to which the Sidney Nolan Trust is realising the dream he had so long ago.

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28. Drowned Soldier at Anzac as Icarus - Paul Gough

28. Drowned Soldier at Anzac as Icarus - Paul Gough

Sidney Nolan Drowned soldier at Anzac as Icarus 18 November 1958 textile dye, sgraffito, coloured crayon on coated paper 25.4 x 30.4 cm, Australian War Memorial ART91309 Today few painters can approach the subject of Gallipoli without reference to the extraordinary suite of paintings created by Sidney Nolan. Between the mid-1950s and the late 1970s he painted over 250 striking images of the most infamous peninsular in modern history. Yet Nolan spent only a day on the former battlefield in 1956. It left an indelible memory. ‘I stood on the place where the first ANZACs had stood, looked across the straits to the site of ancient Troy, and felt that here history had stood still’, he recalled. ‘I visualised the young, fresh faces of the boys from the bush, knowing nothing or war of faraway places, all individuals, and suddenly all the same – united and uniform in the dignity of the common destiny.’ Fusing the bare hills of the Dardanelles with the harshness of the Australian bush, Nolan blurred one iconic landscape into another. Using his trademark materials – textile dye, polymer medium, coloured crayon, coated paper – he created bare, almost minimal, images suffused with colour, executed hastily, without wasted effort. As memoryscapes they are compelling. They conjure up the crowded emptiness of the forbidding terrain of No-Man’s-Land. Offshore, a dead or dying soldier, floats in a cobalt sea. Nolan’s brother had drowned in 1945 and the beaches off Gallipoli had claimed the lives of hundreds of ANZACs and their allies in 1915. Here, a forlorn Icarus lies facedown in the indifferent ocean. Poignant and bleak, these paintings meld agonising personal and public memories. Nolan evokes rich layers of recall and emotion, rendering the landscape silent witness to both historic and very contemporary events. Paul Gough Professor Paul Gough is Pro Vice-Chancellor and Vice-President of RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia. He is a painter, broadcaster and writer he has exhibited internationally and is represented in the permanent collection of the Imperial War Museum, London, the Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, and the National War Memorial, New Zealand. In addition to painting Gallipoli and the battlefields of the Western Front he has published widely about war art, commemoration and remembrance of wars.

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27. Riverbend I - Ian Dungavell

27. Riverbend I - Ian Dungavell

My first encounter with Riverbend was, appropriately enough, as an undergraduate at the Australian National University where it used to greet me on every visit to the Chifley Library, the chief resort of art history undergraduates. I say appropriately because Sidney Nolan had been one of the first Creative Arts Fellows at the University in 1965, appointed to add some much-needed cultural fertiliser to the barren Canberra landscape. Though not painted in Canberra it belongs to that period in his life. When I saw the painting, twenty years later, it was hung on a curved screen wall so that you felt that you could almost walk into it. The landscape struck me. It shimmered with an almost symbolist vagueness. Even with the river lapping at the bottom of the panels, it exuded heat. You could smell those dry summer days when the sun lifts the oils from the eucalypts and scents the air. Inevitably people compare Riverbend with the water lilies cycle at the Orangerie in Paris, but Monet has none of the intensity of Nolan. Gradually you notice the figures among the trees and realise that an epic story is playing out. I was surprised to find I much preferred Riverbend.

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26. Self Portrait in Youth - Barry Pearce & Duncan Fallowell

26. Self Portrait in Youth - Barry Pearce & Duncan Fallowell

Sidney Nolan’s manner of seizing an image might have earned him a similar reference to his contemporary Willem de Kooning as a slipping glimpser. With his eye’s aperture Nolan would blink before a motif, turn quickly away, and embrace a prey that may never have been snared with an orthodox gaze; like the shapes and glimmers of a spirit world snapped by ghost hunters. Nolan, swift, impatient, preferred this process over time-honoured construction through drawing and a slower rationale of layering, vouchsafing him an original place in the story of modern Australian painting. He had discovered a counterpart in the hallucinatory visions of the nineteenth century French Symbolist poet Arthur Rimbaud in the late 1930s. Rimbaud became disheartened when he felt unable to make the ultimate transition into his parallel universe, and gave up poetry altogether at the age of twenty. Nolan came as close as possible to such an idea of disembodied transition in the spray paintings of Chinese mountains and mists and pure abstractions made during the last decade of his life at The Rodd. Amongst them was the remarkable Self portrait in youth, of 1986, interpreted by some as a reflection of the artist’s fading reputation. However to discern the intention of this ambiguous, valedictory spectre of himself, attired perhaps in the long Irish coat with fur collar Nolan so loved to wear in winter, we need to ponder an earlier version of 1943, in which horizontal stripes of colour on his forehead, palette and brushes like weapons of intent, emanate the stance of a rebel. Four decades later the stripes have become vertical, shifted to the periphery, the rebel in retreat. It is as if the artist has walked through the portal of a Jean Cocteau mirror, turning back to us whispering that he had always, like his hero Rimbaud, only ever wanted to become immersed in the other side.

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25. Peter Grimes - David Lipsey

25. Peter Grimes - David Lipsey

"From Sidney Nolan’s gargantuan output, and thousands of great paintings, how to choose one? The simplest is to opt for the one I know best, for it is the one that I look at daily on my study wall: Peter Grimes. The picture depicts the last scene of Benjamin Britten’s opera. The eponymous fisherman, hated by the locals after two of his apprentices have died as a consequence of his pursuing his overwheening ambition, has taken his boat, in the top left corner of the picture, and scuttled it. He drowns. Grimes of course is Britten’s creation. He is socially cut off, as Britten felt he was by his homosexuality, At first blush it is hard to see why Nolan should share this sense of isolation. Despite his ferocious work rate, he was a gregarious personality, on fire with his own energy and creativity. And yet there are elements in his biography which meant he was a man who did not belong. He escaped through bloody minded determination from his working class origins – his upbringing by a bookmaker who worked on the trams. He ended up with Sir Kenneth Clarke his great friend and admirer. Until finally settling at The Rodd in Herefordshire, he was an inveterate traveller, greedy for more though this was in tension with a constant relationship with the Australian bush and its people. When I look at the picture, I see Nolan and hear Britten."

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24. Policeman in a Wombat Hole - Kay Whitney

24. Policeman in a Wombat Hole - Kay Whitney

"I chose this painting for the way it engages and enthralls the thousands of children who visit it each year. It is whimsical, playful, irreverent and loaded with symbolism. These qualities are not lost on young audiences. Children ‘get Nolan’. As an educator, I sit with them on the floor of the gallery and ask them to look and look again. “Tell me what you see? What do you think is happening in this painting?” Their eyes get wider, it’s hard not to giggle and the deluge of observation and opinion begins. The artist would be pleased I’m sure! The painting retells the incident where the Kelly Gang thwarts a police search party at Stringybark Creek. Constable McIntyre managed to flee and hid in a wombat hole. True story! The trooper is comically depicted upside down, head in the sand, arms and legs protruding from the wombat hole. A handwritten note provides clues to the narrative: “Ned Kelly and others stuck us up today, when we were disarmed. Lonigan and Scanlon shot. I am hiding in a wombat hole until dark”. In the painting, we see a displaced and startled wombat and a magpie and lizard look on. Their inclusion suggests that Nolan was familiar with Ned Kelly’s Jerilderie Letter. At one point in the Jerilderie Letter, Ned Kelly describes the police officers as: “a parcel of big ugly, fat-necked, wombat-headed, big-bellied, magpie-legged, narrow hipped, splay-footed sons of Irish Bailiffs and English Landlords”. The children are shocked by the cheekiness of this, but equally delighted, and they can’t contain their laughter by now. They promise me they will never to be so rude to a police officer! The Jerilderie Letter offers an historical insight into Australian identity and is one of only two original Kelly documents known to have survived. In it, Kelly outlines the justifications for his actions and the injustices he and his family suffered at the hands of a corrupt police force. This manifesto is regarded by some as an early call for an Australian republic. Children are drawn to Nolan’s vibrant use of colour, bold form and a narrative that transports them to Australia in the ‘olden days’. Nolan’s paintings are brought to life with what children see, think and wonder. “These paintings are about a game of hide and seek,” a child offers. “I wonder what it’s like inside a wombat’s burrow,” another child speculates. “Is it dark in there? Is it quiet? What does it smell like? Eeew!” We all pretend to be bushrangers, mount our steeds and set up camp in front of another painting. I grew up in ‘Kelly Country’, near Jerilderie. Here, the sunlight flattens forms and big skies end abruptly where the earth begins like a hard-edge abstract painting. Nolan’s landscapes resonate with me. I reckon Nolan has nailed it, on so many levels, in this painting.

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23. Agricultural Hotel - Philip Mead

23. Agricultural Hotel - Philip Mead

Sidney Nolan’s art has embedded some powerfully iconic images into the Australian cultural optic: the black letter box of Ned Kelly’s quilted iron armour, sometimes with Ned’s eyes, sometimes a furnace, or just a clear view to a yellowing Australian landscape. Stripey Eliza Fraser and the convict on their dark dream of an island. The doomed, camel-mounted explorers Burke and Wills, always looking out at the viewer in stupefied photo opportunities, on the fringe of watery-grey ramshackle settlements, or mangrove-stranded. Returned soldiers with skewed faces. Always painterly and knowingly naïve, there are also ideas strewn across Nolan’s work: surreal drop-ins, or are they interlopers? – desert birds and decoy ducks in mid-air, upside-down horses in free-fall, sheep carcasses in trees. Metaphysical paintings – what is there exactly? they ask – free of mannerism. This painting was used on a dustjacket of Cynthia Nolan’s 1962 travelogue, Outback, about her, Sidney and their daughter Jinx’s travels across the centre and the west in 1948, the year of their marriage. This painting was probably inspired by a slightly earlier trip to Bourke in north-western New South Wales. With other paintings of hotels of the same year – “Royal Hotel,” “Dog and Duck” it seems to epitomise the haunting, desolate outback that Nolan would shortly expatriate himself from. A relict landscape, the remains of an earlier era of settlement well on its way to extinction. That’s J. Sheehan presumably, front and centre, with his clean white shirt. Irish Australian but with hidalgo moustaches, a singular type of the Licensee. The landscapes of these hotel paintings are evenly divided between a cinnabar-tinged ochre foreground and a white-glowing azure sky. Barely visible on the horizon are some mauve mullock heaps, and beyond that a blue range, but it might as well be another planet. “Agricultural Hotel” is less grand than Nolan’s other hotels, it has only one storey, two tin chimneys. The metaphysical dimension is apparent from the absurd, wire-framed contraption on the roof of the hotel, the skeleton of a reaper-binder. Why is it there? Or, is it there? Sheehan must dream of being a purveyor of agricultural implements as well as a hotel licensee, and this machine is a figment of his imagination, a sketch. Nolan sees a beautifully coloured landscape, precarious as a movie set, almost empty, but inhabited somehow, haunted by incomprehensible individuals. The psyche of the place is so delicate and finely balanced.

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22. Women and Billabong - Anthony Plant

22. Women and Billabong - Anthony Plant

"Having been immersed in Sidney Nolan and his work for the last 18 years and meticulously tutored during that time by Mary Nolan, I really did think that of all people I had seen most of his art and artefacts - tiny scraps of ink splattered tracing paper, the endless panels of his Snake and Shark murals, piles of polaroid photographs, yearly note books and diaries, annotated books, bottled foetuses and an elephant and a giraffe skull. I had already chosen a painting that I wished to write about. A small early work of someone killing a chicken with the drops of blood, complete with shadows, caught in the instant before they hit the ground. Typically Nolan. Addressing the gory and potentially difficult but painted with a degree of sensitivity and insight that, on face value, renders the subject seemingly harmless. As with most Nolan works, however, there is a sense of the ‘impending’. And it was this sense that completely overwhelmed and shocked me on seeing ‘Women and Billabong’ at Pallant House. I know the story of Mrs Fraser. I know Sidney’s paintings of this period. I have seen photographs of this painting but none of this had prepared me for the experience of being so close to it. The tiny figure of Mrs Fraser is the epitome of vulnerability, dwarfed in a menacing landscape of sinisterly succulent foliage. It is not possible to describe how delicately the woman is painted – it has to be seen. But it is very clear she has been caught in just one second of respite, like the drops of blood. And that time will soon restart to deliver all that impending and encroaching menace. Maybe this is Nolan’s secret and what makes his painting so compelling. He plays with the imagination. He constantly invites the viewer to engage. Like reading a novel or a poem his paintings give the framework and inspiration but it is for the viewer to embellish it into their own world. Anthony Plant is Director of Sidney Nolan Trust. Sidney Nolan, Women and Billabong, 1957, Polyvinyl acetate on hardboard, 152.4 x 121.9 cm, © The Trustees of the Sidney Nolan Trust

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21. Steve Hart Dressed as a Girl -Jennifer Higgie

21. Steve Hart Dressed as a Girl -Jennifer Higgie

My favourite Sidney Nolan work must be the 'Ned Kelly' series from 1946. I partly grew up in Canberra, and seeing these paintings at the National Gallery was my first real introduction to Nolan – and I could look at them for hours. The shift in painterly tone and treatmentbetween the bluntly painted horses and humans and the dream-like landscape they move through like ghosts taught me so much about how paint could embody disjunction and how modern artists could illustrate stories as deeply as their renaissance counterparts did. I never tire of these paintings and whenever I return to Canberra, I look them up.

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20. Brian the Stockman at Wave Hill Mounting a Dead Horse - Damian Smith

20. Brian the Stockman at Wave Hill Mounting a Dead Horse - Damian Smith

In 1952 Australian artist Sidney Nolan was commissioned by the Queensland-based newspaper The Brisbane Courier Mail to travel through rural Queensland and the Northern Territory to record a drought that was rated as the worst on record. For the farmers located there a major challenge where cattle management was concerned was the basic lack of rail infrastructure. When the cattle were healthy teams of stockman, known locally as ‘jackeroos’, would heard their animals along stock routes thousands of miles long. In the case of severe drought however, the animals were effectively stranded. In that year some 250,000 perished, baked to the point of mummification in the unforgiving heat. Studying Nolan’s artworks prior to 1952 it is hard to imagine that this lyrical Australian Modernist would produce not only paintings and drawings, but also a series of near forensic photographs that recorded those desperate scenes. The harshness of the Australian ‘outback’ in its unforgiving space, heat and remoteness appear in each successive scene. Desiccated carcasses, some doubly cursed for they are stuck in trees after drowning but one season prior, leer like medieval gargoyles where others fall supine akin to the mummified animals of Pompeii. Critics at the time even drew comparison between Nolan’s drought paintings and the death piles seen at Auschwitz, perceiving metaphors of human behavior at its worst. Within the sixty-one medium format photographs taken by Nolan one in particular stands out – ‘Brian the Stockman at Wave Hill Station Mounting a Dead Horse’. As the title suggests the solitary stockman can be seen preparing to mount a mummified horse carcass. There is no doubting that it is indeed deceased. The cadaver’s empty eye sockets are no less galvanizing than the gaping and exposed rib cage that faces the startled viewer. In contrast the hind leg, kicked back in rigor mortis, appears to suggest forward motion. It is a picture of action. Compositionally the photograph is tightly arranged; a slight vignetting of the camera lens causes the outer edges of the composition to darken, thus focusing the viewer’s attention. The rider’s leg runs at a parallel to the horse’s own front trotter. Bones are scattered on the endless plain that surrounds them, the infinite horizon creating negative shapes beneath the equine belly. Reflecting on this moment, Nolan stated, “Death takes on a curiously abstract patter under these arid conditions. Carcasses of animals are preserved in strange shapes which have often a kind of beauty, or even grim elegance.” But one really has to laugh! ‘Brian the Stockman at Wave Hill Station Mounting a Dead Horse’ is a visual example of Australian gallows humour – an antipodean ‘rider of the apocalypse’ off to reap its deadly bounty. Equally however, there is a grim fascination with the conditions that caused this rotting beast to remain in tact to the point where it could be saddled and potentially mounted. In conversation with an old ‘bush cocky’ as the inhabitants of remote Australia are called in a vernacular that is fast dying out, I learn that the eyes of the horse would have been pecked from its skull by crows when the animal lay dying. And extreme heat would cause sufficient contraction of the hide to keep the bodily form intact. At the time when the photograph was taken Nolan could not have known that Wave Hill Station would later become the site of the famous Gurindji Strike of 1966 when 200 Aboriginal stockman, led by Vincent Lingari, ‘walked off’ the station in protest of their brutal living conditions. In ‘Brian the Stockman’ we see the first representation of those challenging environs and the toughness of the Australian Aboriginal worker. Clearly the photograph has significance as a masterpiece of mid-20th Century photography. In the context of Australian art history it is also the earliest example of an artwork that combines site-specific installation and performance to camera. It marks Nolan not only as a Modernist but also as a distinct precursor to the art practices one associates with post-Modernity. Of all of Nolan’s vast outpouring, this photograph remains, in my mind, a work of originality, inventiveness, forward thinking and compositional panache. It is as artworks should be, utterly of its time and utterly timeless.

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19. Angel and the Tree - Dr Nicky McWilliam

19. Angel and the Tree - Dr Nicky McWilliam

"Angel and the tree was one of the works in my mother, Eva Breuer’s private collection. Eva Breuer was an art dealer in Sydney and she specialised in artworks by significant Australian artists. Her gallery Eva Breuer Art Dealer was located on Moncur Street Woollahra, Sydney, Australia. Angel and the tree remains in the collection of Eva Breuer’s family. Eva Breuer (d:2010) had a close relationship with Sid and Mary Nolan and with the extended Nolan family and the gallery maintained contact with Mary until she died. They shared a personal friendship as well as a close, strong and successful professional relationship. Eva curated and held many Nolan exhibitions at her gallery sold many Nolan works. Eva produced multiple colour catalogues of all the Nolan exhibitions she curated and held at her gallery. The Art Gallery of NSW holds the archives of the Eva Breuer Art Dealer gallery including all the important Sidney Nolan material generated by her at the gallery." Dr. Nicky McWilliam Angel and the Tree was recently loaned for a curated exhibition in 2016 at University of Queensland entitled We who love: The Nolan slates. This exhibition is currently on view at Heide until 2 April 2017.

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18. Snake - David Walsh

18. Snake - David Walsh

Nolan developed a gestural language for Snake in the same way that most artists work. He composed and executed a little picture, influenced, as we all know, by aboriginals and their art, and New Guineans, and their snake dances. He then painted similar scenes with a quicker hand and fewer gestures, and he repeated this thousands of times, till the paintings were made by muscle memory. As his gestures implied an as yet unseen image, he directed his work like a tennis player - but the paintings came automatically. In my opinion the end point of this process is the remarkable bats, each made with a few strokes, but embodying batness. For Snake and Shark Nolan made a mock-up of the larger picture and filled in the details, so he may not have set out to become an automatic painter. But he used what emerged, a fortuitous accident, to drive him further. That's how great creatives create - not by standing on the shoulders of giants, but by extracting nuance from happenstance. Nolan has harnessed serendipity, to our great good fortune."

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17. Quilting the Armour - Jackie Haliday

17. Quilting the Armour - Jackie Haliday

"I’ve chosen Quilting the Armour because my interest lies in how this Sidney Nolan painting quietly disarms the Ned Kelly legend as the practicalities of the behemoth armour is tenderly padded by Kelly’s sister Kate. The contrast of the hard with the soft; the steel plough shares against the blue fabric lining; the impenetrable folk hero versus the vulnerabilities of the man. I had this same feeling when I recently made a tour of ‘Kelly Country’ - Stringybark Creek, Beechworth, Chiltern, Glenrowan with its six metre Ned Kelly statue. Childhood memories and fears of the menace of the outback dissolving as I drove through an innocuous landscape dotted with quiet country towns each with their stake of Kelly mythology. This notion of disarmament is further compounded by Nolan’s cartoonlike flattening of the central figure in the foreground or downstage. It gives the impression of the protagonist breaking the fourth wall and stepping out and addressing the viewer directly, now as a seamstress. While the everyday farm life is still humming along in the background, the armour is presented as an unfinished costume further dismantling the man from the legend. However as viewer we don't yet know what the next scene will be because Nolan’s horizon offers us an ambiguity. Is it the closing of the day, a peaceful dusk and the safety of darkness? Or is Nolan signalling the dawn breaking and the sun rising allowing Kelly to don his costume to play out the final, fateful Last Stand?" Jackie Haliday is a Galerist Sidney Nolan, Quilting the Armour, 1947, Enamel paint on composition board, 90.4 x 121.2 cm, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Gift of Sunday Reed, 1977.

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16. Rimbaud at Harar - Edmund Capon AM OBE

16. Rimbaud at Harar - Edmund Capon AM OBE

"The precocious and unpredictable French poet Arthur Rimbaud who began writing at the age of fifteen and then abandoned literature altogether within a decade was a kindred and inspirational spirit for Sid Nolan. Nolan often spoke of how he had contemplated being a poet rather than a painter and Rimbaud remained a lifelong obsession for him.This restless soul who sought through poetry to find and express the inexpressible and who spoke of the ‘rational disordering of all the senses’ instilled in the young Nolan that pursuit of avenues of sensibility and experience which defied the predictable and the acceptable. The poet’s excessive and rebellious lifestyle, fuelled by alcohol and hashish, to get beyond good and evil, resonated with an impatient teenage Nolan who had left school at the age of fourteen. There was an indelible streak of anarchy in Nolan and Rimbaud was the perfect alter-ego; they were both ‘outsiders’ and Sidney courted that image. In an interview with Michael Heywood in London in April 1991 he said ‘oh yes I was an outsider – as a worker, a son of a worker, going to a factory at 14, I was fully conscious of being an outsider’. Nolan once said that in art ‘the screw has to be turned even further, that one has to be violent, more avant-garde, more abstract’. Such words could indeed have come from the very mouth of the young Rimbaud who, following his abandonment of poetry and literature, and indeed France, eventually ended up as a merchant and trader in Harar in Abyssinia (Ethiopia). Thus it was that Sidney and Cynthia eventually made their pilgrimage to Africa in the autumn of 1962. The tangible result of these travels was a series of hugely seductive and often enigmatic wildlife paintings; images of zebras, elephants, monkeys, lions, all sketchily rendered but with a strange tenderness and unusually sombre colours which imbues them with an aura of mystery. That same sense of mystery is evoked in Rimbaud at Hara with its sensitive but melancholy tones, and the haunting ghost-like image of Rimbaud who seems to blend with the undergrowth from which he uncertainly emerges rather like a figure of the risen Christ. Perhaps that was in Nolan’s mind as he pondered the life of his once mischievous hero who had turned to commerce in the unlikely and distant environment of Ethiopia. The composition is typical Nolan; the figure of Rimbaud, naked and vulnerable, his eyes looking to the heavens, is isolated in an unlikely landscape under a darkening sky that seems to herald an uncertain world. And yet there is a silent beauty in Nolan’s almost mellifluous texture and often surprising colours; that strange ominous muddy sky, the colour of stagnant water, suddenly enlightened with flashes of yellow and red. These strange colours are echoed in his African Landscape (1963 and now in the Art Gallery of New South Wales) in which the landscape seems to be aflame with an untrammelled ferocity. Ferocious and beautiful; the outsider who in Clark’s words became ’the Australian Rimbaud’." Edmund Capon AM OBE was director of the Art Gallery of New South Wales 1978–2011. Sidney Nolan, Rimbaud at Harar, 1963, oil on hardboard, (1917-92) / Private Collection / © Sidney Nolan Trust / Photo © Agnew's, London / Bridgeman Images

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15. Study for Samson et Dalila - Elijah Moshinsky

15. Study for Samson et Dalila - Elijah Moshinsky

Working with Sidney Nolan on the design of Samson et Dalila at Covent Garden, 1981 "I was invited by Sir John Tooley to direct a new production of Samson et Dalila by Saint-Saens to be conducted by Sir Colin Davis, with Jon Vickers and Shirley Verrett. Who did I think would be the appropriate designer for this project? The opera was not highly regarded at the time and considered to be a sort of French orientalist perfumed affair and a piece of kitsch. I rather admired the opera and thought that it needed a visual presentation which took it out of ordinary stage design and into a realm of biblical symbolism. I immediately thought of Sidney Nolan whose paintings were inscribed into my Australian unconscious. John Tooley seemed excited by the idea and the next day I was told that he had spoken to Nolan who was fascinated by the prospect of designing an opera, and could I meet him at his apartment in Whitehall Court. We met and it was an instant rapport. He did know the opera, he did not know the procedure to design a huge piece like this – I was to organise all that. But we talked about music. Music was of great importance to him. He was a connoisseur of nuance in performance. He told me that he chose to live in Whitehall Court because he said he could just walk across the bridge to the Festival Hall for concerts. Was Solti’s Beethoven better than Tennstedt’s? Did I not prefer Ashkenazy’s playing to Brendel’s? What about literature – Patrick White? Robert Frost or Auden? This exciting talker, this man of enormous cultural sensibility who adored music, poetry and literature, totally enchanted me and a firm commitment was made to enter the project which would be performed about 7 months later. At this point he then disappeared on a long journey to travel the silk route to Mongolia. Several months passed and Covent Garden began pressing me for designs to start work. There seemed no way to reach him but by some means John Tooley was able to get a message through to him and indeed received a phone call from Sidney which he imagined to be from a phone booth in the Gobi desert. Yes, Sidney was still on board with the venture and keen. He was about to return and had discovered exotic silk fabrics in China which he wanted to incorporate into the costumes. A week later he was back. Covent Garden was about to go into its summer recess and we had to come up with a functioning design almost immediately. We had decided that we wanted to create layers of imagery on gauze cloths, sometimes four deep, to provide a complete but shifting environment of colour and design for the stage action. A model of the Royal Opera House stage was built to a large scale into which he could experimentally hang his paintings. This was delivered to his studio and we began intensive work. We had to work intensely and quickly. I was to guide him step by step through the demands of the opera and build up the whole scheme of the production. This could only be done if we met every day and worked together as the model developed. He painted quickly and we would test the scale and value of each cloth in the model. We would have lunch and discuss the plan for that day. I would read him the libretto, sometimes passages from the Bible, sometimes parts of Jung’s essays and sometimes Freud on Monotheism. We began by tackling the scene with the Hebrews at the beginning – how did this relate to the later scenes, moving to the world of Dalila? And he began to consider the scenes in terms of colour and texture. But we did not want scenery as conventionally understood. We did not want the kitsch of Hollywood Biblical epics. I wanted a stage in which the performers could populate the Nolan world. ‘What is that first scene about?’ Sidney kept enquiring. Not the action of the scene but its nub, its inner core. Eventually he forced me to find it. It was about God. The Israelites feeling lost and abandoned by Jehovah. This idea absolutely hit him with force. He said ‘What if we do it from God’s point of view?’ He then painted, very quickly using vivid dyes a blue background and on it he put the imprint of his own hand painted black. The effect in performance would be that we saw the Israelites obscurely in white and blue sections of the stage picture, and the imprint of the black hand would act as a void through which we could see the disposed Hebrews clearly. This symbol, he explained to me, came to him from aboriginal rock paintings. It was, he said, the first expression of Man’s self awareness. For Nolan, it was a symbol of creativity in man, The Hand of God. Standing next to him every day as we probed and invented the world of the opera, I was aware of a man who had a visionary grasp on his art, who could somehow actualise the mythic, the essential though behind ordinary reality. There was no stagey banality or indeed practicality in his work. It was there, to mine the inner core of some essential sense of man’s relationship to landscape, light, sexuality and tragedy. When it came to devising the key image for the production, something that defined the core of the myth of Samson, Sidney came up with an enormously powerful image of the blind Samson, eyes streaming blood. It was about the tragedy of man himself. Samson / Oedipus, overwhelming in the theatre, red raw background surrounded the ghost shape of a face in agony with its eyes put out. Like the helmet of Ned Kelly, this Samson was an essential image of human suffering." Elijah Moshinsky is a world renowned director of theatre and opera with a career spanning over thirty years. He has worked with the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, the Metropolitan Opera, New York and the Royal National Theatre amongst numerous other venues. Sidney Nolan, Study for Samson et Dalila, 1981, Ink on card, 30.5 x 24cm, © The Trustees of the Sidney Nolan Trust

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14. Death of a Poet - Simon Martin

14. Death of a Poet - Simon Martin

"Sidney Nolan’s ‘Death of a Poet’ (1954) is an image that stays in the mind long after viewing it. Perhaps this is because of its dreamlike and even Surreal qualities. At first the image seems so serene: the cast of a head with its eyes closed, as if in sleep, seems to float in the air amidst foliage before an intense, cerulean sky. And yet, it depicts the death mask of the Australian bush ranger Ned Kelly, a hero/ anti-hero figure who obsessed Nolan. This depiction of Kelly is so unlike all the other images of him created by Nolan: the distinctive armoured helmet is absent and literally disembodied, Kelly is not presented with a heroic gait or in a dramatic moment from his infamous history. Instead we have the man at peace, no longer a threatening or heroic figure, but passive and introspective. The death mask has been on display in Melbourne since Kelly’s death, no doubt originally to provide conclusive evidence of his demise, but inevitably it has given life to the myth that surrounds him. Here it is presented like an archaeological fragment from an ancient civilisation found amongst the foliage, but in a way that also carries other resonant associations. As TG Rosenthal has stated it suggests images of Christ and the Crown of Thorns, but it also recalls the famous life mask of the British poet William Blake, and through its title perhaps relates to Arthur Rimbaud, whose poetry Nolan admired and whom he related to Kelly through their early deaths. The association with Blake’s life mask also brings us to Francis Bacon’s series of Studies for a Portrait after a life mask of Blake, which he began two months after this painting. It raises the question of whether Bacon had seen this painting. Nolan had settled in Britain in the previous year, and although the foliage is clearly based on Australian plant forms (which recall other paintings from the same year such as Australian Honeyeater and Australian Foliage, both 1954, Leicester County Council Artworks Collection), it suggests that he may have been influenced by paintings by British ‘Neo-Romantic’ artists of the 1940s and 50s, such as Graham Sutherland’s series of Thorn Trees and images of poets surrounded by foliage by John Craxton such as Dreamer in a Landscape (1941, Tate) and Poet in a Landscape (1941, private collection) which had been published in Horizon magazine in 1941. We were very keen for this work to be part of the exhibition Transferences: Sidney Nolan in Britain’ at Pallant House Gallery because through these resonant connections it reveals how much Nolan’s work was bridging both Australian and British art in the post-war period. We are very grateful to the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool for lending it to the exhibition, but also the members of the Exhibition Supporters Circle who have helped fund the conservation and loan preparation costs to enable this important work to be included." Simon Martin is a curator, writer and art historian. He is also Director of Pallant House Gallery. Sidney Nolan, Death of a Poet, 1954, Ripolin on Masonite board, 91.5 x 122 cm, © The Trustees of the Sidney Nolan Trust/Bridgeman Art Library

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13. Untitled (Catani Arch, St Kilda) - David Rainey

13. Untitled (Catani Arch, St Kilda) - David Rainey

"Sidney Nolan was born the very same day Carlo Catani turned 65 and retired from the Public Works Department in Melbourne. The Florence-born engineer’s last major project had been reclamation of the St Kilda foreshore as a public space. His elegant arched footbridge linking the sea baths and tea rooms was built in 1916. Much frequented by Nolan throughout his life, Catani Arch is captured evocatively in this little known 1942 painting. Appropriately, given he knew Mary Boyd when he painted it and 36 years later she became his third wife, this work once graced the London home of the Boyd family. Nolan grew up in St Kilda - in his words a ‘kitsch heaven’. Luna Park and its Big Dipper, the Palais Theatre, the Pier, Catani Gardens, the Esplanade - all promised youthful excitement and mature nostalgia. He was 25 when he painted Catani Arch. For a year he had lived in a ménage à trois with John and Sunday Reed at Heide having finally accepted the reality that his marriage to Elizabeth Paterson was finished. What was more, Australia was at war, Japanese forces were advancing, he had been drafted into the army and stationed in the Mallee district of Western Victoria. The past was past, the present had its allure, but the future seemed bleak. The painting though, reflects little of this. Rather, drawing on that ‘rare lyrical talent’ recognised in Nolan even then by fellow painter Albert Tucker, the work suggests a genius of vision that would soon blossom in his Wimmera paintings. Painted on muslin covered board most likely prepared by Sunday Reed and taken to Nolan on a weekend visit, it displays ‘the radical flatness, high horizons, virtual absence of conventional linear perspective and bright primary colours’, recognised by Jane Clark in her 1987 Nolan retrospective Landscape and Legends as ‘interpreting the Australian landscape in an entirely new way.’ A colour-drenched work, with abstracted simplicity of form and Rouault-like outlining, Catani Arch’s gravel concourse and archway float diagonally like a yellow-frocked child. Imagination is key. One can imagine Nolan here, a boy in his kitsch heaven; here, away from their parents, he and Elizabeth keep rendezvous; almost opposite, across the Esplanade in their Marli Place flat, their daughter is conceived; perhaps here, he and John Sinclair wonder at a full moon rising over the bay and he conjures up the iconic Moonboy image. Here too, much later, he will walk with his daughter Amelda. Explaining to her the bitterness of his Paradise Garden verses about his Heide years and their acrimonious aftermath, he wrote ‘You remember walking by that little bridge below the Esplanade. I hope to one day write a book in which the poetry celebrates rather than castigates, and is more like what I thought about at eighteen standing by that bridge.’ And this painting of ‘that little bridge below the Esplanade’ does celebrate. It celebrates art, and life, and wonder. Nolan spoke of his own ‘wonders of the world’ in the 1987 poem Oz Digger and imagined them ‘sweet heaven in pieces.’ This surely is one of the pieces." David Rainey is an independent Australian writer and researcher. He co-curated the exhibition Ern Malley: the Hoax and Beyond at Heide Museum of Modern Art in 2007. His main area of interest is the avant-garde art and literature of WW2 Melbourne and later. He maintains the website which centres mainly on Nolan and Heide, and also the Centenary website. Untitled (Catani Arch, St Kilda), 1942, oil on cotton gauze on board, 37.0 x 45.5 cm, private collection, Canberra,© Sidney Nolan Trust

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12. Hare in Trap - Nicholas Usherwood

12. Hare in Trap - Nicholas Usherwood

"Painted in 1946, Hare in A Trap was one of a significant group of paintings that Nolan kept by him throughout his life, a fact that, in itself, provides a clue to the very particular place this enigmatic and hauntingly beautiful work seems to occupy in his art. Nolan always quietly insisted that his work was essentially autobiographical in character but he only ever left the barest of clues as to what he meant by this, leaving it up to writers and critics to speculate. In this case it was Nolan's observation that the blue eyes of the hare were the eyes of his father; his relationship with his tram-driver father, always uneasy, had been further severely strained by his desertion from the army two years earlier. Other elements in any psychological/autobiographical reading that suggest themselves here were the accidental death of his brother Raymond on naval service the year before while a visit to Kelly Country earlier in the year may well have stirred memories of his father's father who had been involved in the police search for Kelly and revived childhood memories of visits to family in North Victoria. These visits had, of course, been made in preparation for the first, iconic 'Ned Kelly' series, also in full flow in 1946, the landscape, with its scrubby bush and scattered trees, being stylistically identical to those of the early Kelly paintings. Close in feeling to it as well are those paintings exploring his childhood memories of St Kilda Beach and Luna Park Funfair of a few months earlier in which he also seemed to be attempting some urgent resolution of a carefree past and his present, turbulent circumstances. But some things here are, for me at least, beyond such speculation, above all those ten, potent, red and white spots underneath the hare's legs – blood and fur - a reference to Freud and Oedipus (literally 'swollen foot'), or simply an essential compositional device?" Nicholas Usherwood is a curator, art critic and writer on contemporary art and culture. He has written for publications including The Times, The Sunday Times, The Daily Telegraph, Arts Reviewand Resurgence and is currently Features Editor of Galleries Magazine. Sidney Nolan, Hare in Trap, 1946, Ripolin enamel on hardboard, 90.5 x 121.5 cm board, Purchased with funds provided by the Nelson Meers Foundation, the Margaret Hannah Olley Art Trust, and the Art Gallery of New South Wales Foundation 2007, © The Trustees of the Sidney Nolan Trust/Bridgeman Art Library

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11. Bird - Deborah Ely

11. Bird - Deborah Ely

"From the 1980s Sidney Nolan spent nearly every Australian summer at Bundanon, Riversdale and Eearie Park, the properties now in the custody of Bundanon Trust and gifted to the Australian public in 1993 by Nolan’s brother-in-law, fellow Australian painter, Arthur Boyd. The isolation and the heat, the Stringybark forest and surrounding escarpment, all contributed to the heady artistic milieu which developed in this landscape along the Shoalhaven River in rural New South Wales. Photographs from the time show breakfasts and lunches out-doors, casual garb (sometimes nightwear) and a relaxed, convivial, atmosphere. At Christmas time images were exchanged: ‘From Mary and Sid to Arthur and Yvonne” and the other way around. Nolan shared Arthur’s studio. Together they drove or hiked to remote places on the Bundanon property to spend the day painting ‘plein air’. The paint is still on the rocks if you know where to look. The local shop-keepers recall Nolan coming in to buy spray-paint and Ripolin (the house paint he favoured and a conservator’s curse). Animals persist throughout Nolan’s work. A giant snake; monkeys, lions and elephants; cows and their carcasses; Ned Kelly’s horse. But birds have a special presence. The persistence of the famous parrot Polly, Leda’s swan. This vibrating black, red and green felt-tip pen bird, of no particular type, was drawn at Bundanon in 1984. It has an incredible energy flowing from its confident line and the strobe effect of the colours shadowing each other and creating a vibration. It’s thread-like legs and, just at the edge of the page, a plant and a butterfly rendered in a dash are both playful and highly skilled at the same time. The drawing reminds us of what a brilliant draftsman Nolan was and how his restless creativity drew him to so many subjects leaving us with a visual trace of his keen intellect." Deborah Ely, the CEO of the Bundanon Trust is an artist and art historian. She was formerly the Visual Arts and Craft Program Manager for Arts NSW and has been Director of Australian Centre for Photography in Sydney, the Centre for Contemporary Photography in Melbourne, EXPERIMENTA and Watershed Media Centre in Bristol. Sidney Nolan, Bird, 1984, felt pen. Bundanon Trust Collection.© Sidney Nolan Trust

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10. Ned Kelly - Shaun Gladwell

10. Ned Kelly - Shaun Gladwell

"Kelly is riding alone, across an open plain. The sharp sunlight delineates all the forms before us - the horse, Kelly’s gun, the distant tree line on this yellow sandy expanse. Everything is clearly and quickly articulated except for that famous body armour and helmet, which magically absorbs all light. Indeed, it is as if light particles are ‘bailed up’ and robbed by the event horizon of this formal black hole. Kelly’s helmet and armour become unknown volumes: both flat and a window into infinite space. Apollo’s order and sunlight is no match for a Dionysian Kelly, who in this instance may be simply riding, but if needed, he will dismount, disarm, endure 20 rounds of bare knuckle boxing and win. This painting of Kelly is arguably the most well known of all Nolan’s works, and certainly the most recognisable of his initial Kelly series. Nolan depicts Kelly riding freely and, more importantly, for his own sense of freedom. We are given a vision of Kelly, the firebrand anti-establishmentarian, in a very precious moment. We are alone with him, away from the gang and all the transpiring drama. From this moment of solitude, we envisage our outlaw riding into his destiny. Nolan’s image is a technical mirroring of its subject matter. It is also painted ‘freely’, in the spirit of our great anti-hero, Kelly. Nolan's technique dances above and around the strict academic laws of volumetric illusion, typically achieved through tonal modelling, accurate proportion and perspective. Nolan instead plays the game of figurative representation in his own idiosyncratic way, subverting artistic convention in the creation of a very ‘modern’ composition. The image has such a graphic intensity that it burns into one’s retina, and even deeper into the individual unconscious. Soon enough, this image of Kelly gallops directly into the collective imaginary of an entire nation and the primers of art history. The 1946 Kelly will effect a shift from being one of many representations of Kelly to possibly the most recognised artistic symbol of this man. Even in terms of other dramatisations of Kelly, can the film interpretations of Mick Jagger or the late, great Heath Ledger, or Julian Schnabel’s ‘plate painting’ of Kelly, ever come close to claiming the iconic power of Nolan’s 1946 Kelly? A great mystery of the painting is the much speculated upon visor in Kelly’s helmet. To see directly through the helmet form (which we know from Nolan’s statements, was inspired by Malevich’s black square) is to enter a wonderful representational dilemma. Is Kelly hollow, or a ‘body without Organs’ as the French philosopher Gilles Deleuze would put it? Is ‘Ned’ constructed purely of mythic surfaces? Nolan would later famously state that every painting of Kelly was in fact a self-portrait. The transparent visor in the helmet suggests that we can all inhabit this empty armour and ask ourselves: do we have it within us to be so wild, so passionate, so revolutionary? The see-through helmet also destabilises the otherwise clearly defined figure/ground relationship. Kelly is stark against the immediate surroundings, but this vivid nature is also within him. Kelly’s agency is extended into the sky through this very powerful pictorial device. To be simultaneously solid and transparent – a dark Dionysus framing Apollo’s light. Given Nolan’s great interest in poetry, I cannot go past images conjured in T.S. Elliott’s ‘the Hollow Men’ (1925). While this poem might not be comparable in thematic, as far as imagery goes the poet’s utterances of “shape without form, shade without colour…”, “The eyes are not here, There are no eyes here…”, “Behaving as the wind behaves” and of course, the poems title, are all evocative of Nolan’s eventual 1946 Ned Kelly portrayal. We simultaneously look at Kelly and look through him, but from behind, as with Casper David Frederich’s Wander Above the Sea of Fog (1818) (this time on a plain rather than a peak). As with Frederich’s figure, we assume we are seeing what Kelly is seeing before him – a vast open expanse. However, instead of us simply looking at Kelly who in turn ‘looks out’, Kelly is looking back at us through the sky itself. He is there before us and already away, taking Nolan with him, into the afternoon, then evening, and into a posterity of open sky and brilliant stars. " Shaun Gladwell was born in 1972 in Sydney, Australia and currently lives and works in London. He is widely considered Australia’s foremost video installation artists but also works across, performance, choreography, painting, photography, sculpture and writing. Sidney Nolan, Ned Kelly, 1946, enamel paint on composition board, 90.8 x 121.5 cm, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Gift of Sunday Reed 1977

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9. Young Soldier - Clare Woods

9. Young Soldier - Clare Woods

"My first meeting with the image of this painting was in a roadside hedge between Kington and Prestigne on the Welsh border. The poster was for an exhibition of works titled Gallipoli by Sidney Nolan at the The Rodd. Firstly this did not feel like any of the Sidney Nolan works I knew and secondly it looked so out of place in this verdant British summer setting, this displaced image instantly worked its magic on me and so we pulled in. Walking down the gravel drive from the field where we had parked, into what at that time can only be described as a farmyard into a large drafty barn and there it was. It greeted us - a vibrant large glossy pink painting that still looked wet to the touch. There were many other works around the barn but this was the painting that caught me and held me and would not let go. It would not let me look at anything else. This haunting image of a young man feels so empty and broken. There is a heavily painted blue over the nose and around two holes where the eyes should peer out, all that is revealed is green emptiness. The mouth is expressionless and looks as if it would never open. The hat, crumpled looking, sits onto a flat head that does not support any ears. The figure is mute, blind and deaf yet the monochrome background is yelling at me, it is so loud. Shouting from behind this shell shocked figure ‘can you see?’" Clare Woods was born in Southampton in 1972 and lives and works in London and Herefordshire. She completed an MA in Fine Art at Goldsmith’s College, London in 1999, after a BA in Fine Art at Bath College of Art, Bath, in 1994. Sidney Nolan, Young Soldier, 1977, Ripolin and oil on board,122.0 x 91.5 cms, Private collection, © Sidney Nolan Trust

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8. In the Cave - Rebecca Daniels

8. In the Cave - Rebecca Daniels

“Nolan was deeply interested in Aboriginal art and repeatedly used images of rock art in his painting because to him its relevance was more than just the link to Australia. Rather, it represented ‘the imprint of prehistoric man …the beginning of art’. In the Cave is a work from the Mrs Fraser and convict series and Nolan represents the figure of Mrs Fraser as an outline while Bracewell is seen wearing the distinctive striped clothes of a prisoner. In 1947, Nolan had travelled to Carnarvon Gorge in Queensland where stencilled handprints had been present on the rocks for over 3,500 years. Nolan was inspired by these and used them in the design of his costumes for The Rite of Spring. He borrowed the Aboriginal system of using hand prints of different sizes and spacings for ranking people. For The Chosen One's costume Cynthia Nolan had cut handprints out of newspaper and Nolan had pinned them to the dancer before they were printed. In line with the sacrificial theme of the ballet, Nolan said he wanted to create the feeling of a naked body being touched and thrown in the air. Nolan transported the setting from Russia to the prehistoric arid Australian outback. His aim was to make the setting universal while remaining close to the atmosphere created by Stravinsky’s rhythmic score. The production of The Rite of Spring at the Royal Opera House in 1962 was a triumph and it is still being performed with the Nolan costumes to this day. It was last revived in 2013 with Claudia Dean, the Australian dancer, in the role of The Chosen One. Dame Monica Mason oversaw rehearsals. Both these works are on display at the exhibition, ‘Transferences: Sidney Nolan in Britain’ that I have curated at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester, opening tomorrow (18th February 2017).” Dr Rebecca Daniels is a Trustee of the Sidney Nolan Trust and was associate editor of Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonne (2016); she lectures widely and has published on Henri Matisse and Walter Sickert. Transferences: Sidney Nolan in Britain runs at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester, from 18th February to 4th June 2017. An illustrated publication accompanies the exhibition, available from Pallant House Gallery and the Sidney Nolan Trust. Visit the Royal Opera House website for information about The Rite of Spring: http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/the-rite-of-spring-by-kenneth-macmillan Sidney Nolan, In the Cave, c.1957, Polyvinyl acetate on board, 121.9 × 152.4 cm, Tate, London, © Sidney Nolan Trust Monica Mason as The Chosen One at the Royal Opera House, London, 1962 by Axel Poignant, gelatin silver photograph, printed 1981, 34 × 29.5 cm, Courtesy Roslyn Poignant, Axel Poignant Archive

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7. Vivisector - Tim Abdallah

7. Vivisector - Tim Abdallah

"Nowadays I have day to day involvement with Sid’s work. Our firm handled the sale of First Class Marksman, 1946 in March 2010 for AUS $5.4m, still the Australian art market record price for a work of art. My best memory of Nolan goes back to 1985, however. In 1985 I was a young, I think the word is ‘callow’, director of a commercial art gallery in Melbourne. In August 1985 we opened a German branch of the gallery in Cologne. Through the kind intercession of Elwyn Lynn, we were able to launch our new venture with an exhibition of paintings and drawings by Nolan, a fantastic coup. Sid and Mary came to visit and attend the opening. I was a babe in the woods, the gallery was a bit under-funded, however Sid was very gracious and the opening went well, two good oils were sold, the Director of the Wallraf-Richartz museum paid us a visit and the exhibition was the subject of a review in the Kölner Stadtanzeiger. Sid and Mary spent 2-3 days in Cologne enjoying the sights. I remember visiting the museum with Sid and listening to his thoughts on the paintings we looked at. It was completely fascinating. The exhibition we had included some paintings from the series Nolan painted as a response to the fuss created by Patrick White’s Flaws in The Glass. As is widely known, Nolan was criticised by White in the book and the friendship they had enjoyed ended in fairly lurid circumstances. Several of the paintings we showed (the best ones, in my opinion) were pretty uncompromising, if not downright vicious. I remember standing in front of one of the paintings and being fairly amazed that the spat had come to this and wondered to Sid if he thought that he might be able to bury the hatchet with White. Sid responded, “Oh no, it’s far too good for that!” Clearly Nolan was enjoying the fight and relishing the artistic possibilities it offered. The art was more important than the friendship. If my memory serves me correctly, it was this painting I was standing in front of when the conversation recorded above took place." Tim Abdallah is Head of Australian Art at Menzies Fine Art Auctioneers and Valuers, Australia.

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6. Dog and Duck Hotel - Jane Clark

6. Dog and Duck Hotel - Jane Clark

"I didn’t include Dog and Duck Hotel in Sidney Nolan’s 70th birthday retrospective exhibition. It was hanging in his sitting room at The Rodd and he didn’t seem keen when I broached the possibility of borrowing it for an eight-month Australian tour. It seemed so firmly and yet ironically ensconced: inversely emblematic of his transplantation from a working class, urban, colonial upbringing to that 17th-century manor farm in England’s green and pleasant land. A painting of a wide-verandahed building set mirage-like against sunbaked earth, with a name somehow redolent of an English duckhunter’s cosy pub. Hanging on a half-timbered wall above chintz-upholstered sofas and Lady Nolan serving tea. Anyway, the Art Gallery of New South Wales had already agreed to lend their Pretty Polly Mine, painted the same year, the first acquisition of Nolan’s work by any public gallery; from the same 1949 series of far north Queensland outback paintings of which reviewer Harry Tatlock Miller had written, ‘I can remember no other exhibition by a contemporary Australian which, with such seemingly disarming innocence of eye and hand, reveals so much individuality of vision… Creatures of the air, he gaily tells us, flew gaudily, unreal, over desert, swamp, rock and river, … a land which existed at the dawn of history’.1 I’d first seen Dog and Duck on a Qantas airways in-flight menu brought home by my grandparents. Unforgettable. Even in reproduction, as Tatlock Miller put it so well, ‘These pictures remain in the mind persistently flavouring the following hours’. Nolan had written to fellow artist Albert Tucker from North Queensland in 1947 about finding a surprisingly old-fashioned Englishness in the ‘lovely old hotels & shops that have been the same for seventy years’; so far distant even from Melbourne, let alone England. And yet, joining a Royal Geographical Society expedition to the Cape York Peninsula and out west to the Carnarvon Range, he described ‘feeling perhaps that a large part of the energy of Australia is contained there’.2 Apparently he did meet a mine manager who fed the local parrots. Who knows if he really found a hotel called ‘Dog and Duck’. No duck ever flew like this one, dangling in the sky. And the small eponymous dog is scarcely there. We do know that the painting was made from memory. Nolan’s habit was to imprint visually almost without seeming to look, storing images indelibly in his imagination for the future; sometimes taking photographs; often writing short encapsulations in notebooks as an aide-mémoire. Back in Sydney, he worked through much of 1948 painting shopfronts, farm machinery, abandoned and working mines, prospectors, explorers, anthills, and seemingly empty desertscapes, as well as birds and old hotels. He painted quickly, here using glossy Ripolin enamel for the clear blue sky (Picasso had called it ‘healthy paint’) and leaving the reddish brown hardboard bare for much of the lower part of the composition: ‘a minimum of matter to give the maximum effect in the manner of a lyric poet’, as the Sydney Morning Herald’s art critic wrote of his technique.3 The 1949 exhibition sold well. Sir Kenneth Clark bought Little Dog Mine: as Slade Professor of Fine Arts at Oxford and former director of the London National Gallery, he was very influential and arguably launched Nolan’s international career. Dog and Duck Hotel went to the Sydney collector Mervyn Horton, later founding editor of Art and Australia. It passed next, in 1972, for the then Australian-record price of $60,000 to Alistair McAlpine who later sold it back to Sidney. Having seen the painting ‘for real’ at The Rodd, I was rather sad, though greatly honoured, to oversee its sale in 2001 as part of The Estate of Sir Sidney Nolan when I was Deputy Chairman at Sotheby’s in Melbourne: the highest-priced lot in the auction. But we met again, picture and I. When I came to work for Mona, in Tasmania — in 2007, before the museum was built — Dog and Duck Hotel had changed hands again and was owned my new boss, David Walsh. It amuses, intrigues, impresses, and inspires me every time I look." 1. The Sun, Sydney, 8 March 1949. 2. 6 and 23 November 1947, quoted in Patrick McCaughey, Bert & Ned: The correspondence of Albert Tucker and Sidney Nolan, The Miegunyah Press, Melbourne, 2006, pp. 67, 71. 3. Paul Haefliger, Sydney Morning Herald, 20 December 1949.

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5. Desert - Andrew Logan

5. Desert - Andrew Logan

"I sat between Sidney and Mary at a lunch and felt We had known each other all our lives. We talked of nature, life, friends, family and art. It was instant love. Two days later Sidney died. I continued to see Mary as my museum The Andrew Logan Museum Of Sculpture is close to the Rodd. A mere moment in our lives but a deep meaningful one. I knew and had seen Sidney's paintings over the years. I chose DESERT 1986 - art gallery NSW An explosion of colour and paint in this Wonderful expression of pure joy of living."

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4. Riverbend I - Francine Stock

4. Riverbend I - Francine Stock

"In just three weeks over the winter of 1964/65, Sidney Nolan executed this massive series – nine panels, each five foot by four - depicting Ned Kelly playing catch-as-catch-can with the police along a creek winding between towering eucalyptus. It was nearly twenty years since his first Kelly series; Nolan was painting now beside another river, the Thames at Putney. In the paintings, the relationship between land and protagonists had changed, too. Like much of Nolan’s work, these nine images (which also serve as one huge landscape) are cinematic, immersive. Like time, the river flows. The drama plays out not as sequential story-board (though there’s narrative) but in accumulated detail. The figures are dwarfed by the gliding river and the hot, aromatic forest. In the first panel, despite Kelly’s distinctive helmet, their bodies could be strips of bark on the gum trees, almost phosphorescent from the refracted glare of the unseen sky. When Nolan was painting Riverbend I I was a child living in Melbourne. For my seventh birthday, an adult cousin gave me a book of the Kelly series with commentary by Robert Melville. Decades later, back in Britain, I’d find a glorious reproduction of Riverbend I and yearn to see it in the ANU collection at the Drill Hall Gallery in Canberra, not so much for the Kelly story as the evocation of a remembered landscape. By then, I’d encountered Nolan’s influence in films …Walkabout, Wake in Fright, The Proposition, Mad Max even… an influence that was always experimental, travelling through time and space to convey the strongest sense of place."

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3. Arabian Tree - Kendrah Morgan

3. Arabian Tree - Kendrah Morgan

"A highlight of the Heide Museum of Modern Art collection, Sidney Nolan’s enigmatic and lyrical painting Arabian Tree is one of the artist’s early masterpieces. In composition and mood it echoes Marc Chagall’s Lovers Among Lilacs (1930, Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY), reproduced in Herbert Read’s important text Art Now, (1933), with which Nolan was familiar. A similarly dreamlike image, Nolan’s picture is redolent with allusions to his ill-fated romance with Melbourne art benefactor Sunday Reed, then at its height. The work is also significant for its connection to a famous literary hoax and it therefore occupies a fascinating place in Australian cultural history. Nolan painted Arabian Tree during his involvement with the progressive Melbourne publishing firm Reed & Harris, which produced the radical cultural journal Angry Penguins in the early 1940s. The picture was intended specifically for the cover of a special edition of Angry Penguins dedicated to the poetry of Ern Malley—a mysterious figure later revealed as a fictitious character invented by two young Sydney poets, James McAuley and Harold Stewart. McAuley and Stewart sent the fake Malley poems to Max Harris, Angry Penguins’ co-editor, in October 1943. Convinced that Malley was a major talent, Harris and John Reed—Sunday’ husband—published the verses in May 1944, after which the hoax was exposed. McAuley and Stewart, who claimed concern for the destruction of craftsmanship and value of meaning in avant-garde poetry, achieved their aim of discrediting Reed & Harris and the modernist art and literature the firm promoted. The hoaxers had composed the Malley poems using randomly selected quotes from the works of literary giants such as Shakespeare and Mallarmé, as well as a rhyming dictionary, army manuals, their own writings, and various other low brow sources. Nonetheless the verses contained some fine rhyming structure and beautiful imagery. Nolan found them a powerful source of inspiration and for Arabian Tree he drew from the poem ‘Petit Testament’, inscribing the work with the following lines: I said to my love (who is living) Dear we shall never be that verb Perched on the sole Arabian Tree The painting depicts an idealised realm in which the lovers are suspended forever in the lush green foliage of the solitary tree, shielded from external reality. The setting is the Wimmera region in north-east Victoria where Nolan was stationed in the army from 1942–44 and includes the distinctive form of Mitre Rock near Mt Arapiles in the background. Although Arabian Tree will be forever linked with the Ern Malley hoax and the downfall of Angry Penguins, it also remains a personal letter of romantic longing—an evocation of lovers transcending earthly constraints to unite in a private paradise." Kendrah Morgan is Curator at Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne. Sidney Nolan, Arabian tree 1943, enamel on plywood, 91.8 x 61 cm, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne, Bequest of John and Sunday Reed 1982

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2. Self Portrait - Angus Trumble

2. Self Portrait - Angus Trumble

"By the time he painted this self-portrait in 1988, the artist rejoiced in the style and title of Sir Sidney Nolan, OM, AC, CBE, RA. In the year of the bicentenary of European settlement of the continent “Nolan,” as he signs himself here, was by far the most eminent living Australian artist, one of relatively few who achieved and sustained an international reputation in the last century - yet he had for decades settled permanently in Britain. The previous year Nolan had celebrated his seventieth birthday. This generated a flurry of celebratory media attention and events. Most notably, in June 1987, the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne launched its Sidney Nolan, Landscapes & Legends: A Retrospective Exhibition: 1937–1987, which later toured to Sydney, Perth, and Adelaide. Also that year Brian Adams published his biography 'Sidney Nolan: Such is Life' and released a documentary film of the same title. Nolan’s stature as a public figure had never been higher. What, then, are we to make of Nolan’s present vision of himself? The smudged inky blues, pinks and subtle browns and greys are characteristic of the artist’s late style. The face is elusive, hazy, veiled, with the head apparently hovering uncertainly between the profile and three-quarter views. The left eye is occluded - partly obscured by his spectacles. The artist’s gaze is, at the very least, averted - as much from himself as from the viewer. Ultimately, the painting is ambiguous, seeming, like all Nolan’s self-portraits, to allude simultaneously to the mask-like character of his public persona, but also to his more complex, certainly introspective poetic imagination. Any suggestion of sculptural monumentality he brings to his own, larger than life-sized head and shoulders seems to be gently mocked by the nervous stripey necktie so tightly knotted at his throat. As my predecessor, the late Andrew Sayers has written, “To some extent the final self-portrait of 1988 is an address to those critics who saw him as having achieved nothing of greatness after Kelly. Or perhaps it was addressed to those, like his one-time friend Patrick White, who mocked what they saw as the artist’s incongruous adoption of the mask of rebellious Kelly and the cloak of English public success." Angus Trumble has been Director of the National Portrait Gallery of Australia since 2014. Sidney Nolan, Self-Portrait, 1988, oil on composition board,121.5 x 91.5 cm; National Portrait Gallery, Canberra; Gift of The Hon. R. L. Hunter, QC, 2006. Donated through the Australian Government’s Cultural Gifts Program, 2006.

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1. Four Abstracts - Alexander Downer

1. Four Abstracts - Alexander Downer

"In this centenary year, it is exciting that this bold and iconic series will be reunited to showcase the depth, quality and international appeal of Sidney Nolan’s art – and his enduring connection with the United Kingdom. This piece in particular is striking and, in many ways, reflects the contemporary, vibrant and optimistic Australia we live in today. I admire the way Australian artists can connect and share the story of our colourful nation where so much beauty and inspiration can be drawn from our vast and diverse geography. I am delighted they will be on display here in the Exhibition Hall at Australia House as we celebrate the centenary of Sidney Nolan in 2017." Hon Alexander Downer AC is the Australian High Commisioner to the UK. These abstracts will be on view to the general public at the Australian High Commission from 21st April to 5th May. Click here for details. Sidney Nolan, four abstracts, 1986, enamel spray on canvas, 305x457cm, Collection of the Sidney Nolan Trust, © Sidney Nolan Trust

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