Nolan drawings at the British Museum

Nolan drawings at the British Museum

24th November 2017 - 11th January 2018, British Museum, London A display in the Prints and Drawings Department (Room 90) of Nolan’s ‘Back of Beyond’ drawings, in which he confronts the horrors of the Australian drought and presents a starkly tragic vision of the Australian outback. In June 1952, Nolan had travelled into the Northern Territory with his then wife Cynthia to record the worst drought in living memory in a series of drawings for the 'Courier-Mail' newspaper. Nolan took photographs of the drought-stricken devastation and made notes in his diary. Together with his later experiences on the Birdsville Track, these became source material for his series of pictures of cattle carcasses painted in 1953 his studio in Sydney and for his subsequent drawings in London, a selection of which will go on display in this exhibition. The British Museum, Great Russell Street, London, WC1B 3DG. Opening Hours: Daily 10.00–17.30, Fridays: open until 20.30. Sidney Nolan, British Museum (2006, 0228.2). Presented by Lady Mary Nolan. © Sidney Nolan Trust.

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Sidney Nolan and Graham Sutherland: A Sense of Place

Sidney Nolan and Graham Sutherland: A Sense of Place

Oriel y Parc, St David's: Sat 30 Sept 2017 - Sun 28th Jan 2018, daily 10am-4pm

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94. Death of Constable Scanlon - Anita Taylor

94. Death of Constable Scanlon - Anita Taylor

“Observed fact and speculated fiction; speculated fact and observed fiction. An account pieced together and explored through image-making, enabling an understanding of the Australian bush, history, folklore and identity - and painting itself. Nolan’s ‘cast iron logic of paint’ elicits a narrative of discovery and provides a vehicle through which to piece together fact and fiction of the subject matter at hand. The Kelly saga was described by Nolan as ‘a story arising out of the bush and ending in the bush’. The Death of Constable Scanlon represents a momentous episode in a major sequence of works that examine the life of bushranger and outlaw, Ned Kelly. A black sky, golden earth; a meeting of opposite forces. A foreboding atmosphere, and a catastrophic incident set in the vastness of the outback. The deep black of Ned Kelly’s suit of armour a shorthanded pictorial device forming a shadow presence, simultaneously floating, embedded, solid, and a cut out shape. Both present and disappearing. Redolent of stealth. And as everything tips and spins, horse and constable to his death, Kelly is still withdrawn from this dramatic moment. Nolan’s inventive painterly language forms a visual equivalent to the events, sensations and settings, as he re-imagines, explores and realises, through a journey of mark-making - and consequent discovery of images, subjects, objects, configuring and reconfiguring space - a way to capture the past and develop a new understanding in the present of this particular Australian story. A subversive grand narrative, this compelling cycle of paintings reveals the Kelly story as freshly to us as it was revealed to the artist through the act of making. Seeing these paintings together in Australia is a special experience, and the Death of Constable Scanlon a pivotal picture in so many ways.” Professor Anita Taylor, Artist & Executive Dean, Bath School of Art and Design at Bath Spa University. https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/art-and-design/ www.drawingprojects.uk. Death of Constable Scanlon, 1946, enamel paint on composition board, 90.4 x 121.2cm, National Gallery of Australia. Gift of Sunday Reed, 1977. https://nga.gov.au/

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Sidney Nolan's Studio

Sidney Nolan's Studio

Housed in part of the 17th century barns at The Rodd, the studio benches were covered in plastic on his death in 1992 and have remained undisturbed since. The studio acted both as a storage space for a large collection of art materials accumulated over 50 years, as well as a working space. It is typically cramped and utilitarian - he would use the larger adjacent barn, now the Gallery, when working on big canvases. His extraordinary choice and variety of painting materials are in evidence on the studio shelves; cans of Ripolin household paint, stocks of dry pigment to be mixed with the ‘new’ white PVA glue, alkyd gel medium, cans of spray paint, along with brushes, squeegees, rags, travel crates and books. Leading Nolan conservator Dr Paula Dredge of the Art Gallery of New South Wales has undertaken a two month residency at The Rodd this Spring, making an initial survey of the studio contents. Conservation work will continue over the coming months. To mark the centenary of Sidney Nolan’s birth, we are delighted to be able to open his last studio to the public for the first time. Housed in part of the 17th century barns at The Rodd, the studio benches were covered in plastic on his death in 1992 and have remained undisturbed since. The studio acted both as a storage space for a large collection of art materials accumulated over 50 years, as well as a working space. It is typically cramped and utilitarian - he would use the larger adjacent barn, now the Gallery, when working on big canvases. His extraordinary choice and variety of painting materials are in evidence on the studio shelves, including cans of Ripolin household paint, stocks of dry pigment to be mixed with the ‘new’ white glue, PVA, present in large quantities, alkyd gel medium, cans of spray paint, along with brushes, squeegees, rags, crates and books. Leading Nolan conservator Dr Paula Dredge of the Art Gallery of New South Wales has undertaken a two month residency at The Rodd this Spring, making an initial survey of the studio contents. Conservation work will continue over the coming months. The studio, together with an exhibition of paintings and objects in the Gallery, finally gives visitors to The Rodd an unrivalled insight into Nolan’s artistic world and an opportunity to understand his use of materials, his different techniques and how he created his works. From Friday 26th May 2017, the studio is open to the public Monday-Saturday, 10.00-17.00 (closed Sundays). Admission is free; donations towards the studio’s ongoing conservation are welcomed. Headphone sets are available for visitors to take a self-guided tour. If you would like to book a tour by a member of staff, or if you wish to bring a group of 8 or more people, please contact the Trust office by email or phone, 01544 260149. Paula Dredge’s residency was funded by the Gordon Darling Foundation, Rowena Danziger AM, Ken Coles AM and the Sidney Nolan Trust. Studio interpretation by...

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